The Epic of Gabriel and Jibreel

The Epic of Gabriel and Jibreel: A Cautionary Tale of Ultimate Friendship (2GETHER picture book collection 4) by [Marin Darmonkow]

The Epic of Gabriel and Jibreel, by Marin Darmonkow, is a children illustrated book filled with deep themes, hidden by the genre of the book. It narrates the story of two children Gabriel and Jibreel, who can’t be friends as one is a refugee, whereas the other one is a normal child living there, whose father is xenophobic.

Darmonkow uses vivid colors in the illustrations and makes them as realistic as possible, making it appealing to children while giving a hint that it refers to situations that happen in our world, giving readers a connection with reality. Furthermore, I appreciated the choice of the boys’ names as both Gabriel and Jibreel are two angels but belonging to two different religions and cultures. This contrast and the friendship between them represent the clash of culture that we find whenever a refugee meets a native and vice versa.

The Epic of Gabriel and Jibreel, by Marin Darmonkow is a quick read, but takes on important and actual themes, so I would recommend it to both children and adults. Furthermore, the plot reminded me of the book The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyle, which deals with similarly deep themes.

This is a thought-provoking children’s book exploring friendship, with provocative commentary on society and detailed imagery that readers will spend plenty of time looking at and appreciating.

Pages: 32 | ASIN: B08NWTHGJR

Buy Now From B&N.com

About Literary Titan

The Literary Titan is an organization of professional editors, writers, and professors that have a passion for the written word. We review fiction and non-fiction books in many different genres, as well as conduct author interviews, and recognize talented authors with our Literary Book Award. We are privileged to work with so many creative authors around the globe.

Posted on November 22, 2021, in Book Reviews, Five Stars and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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