Looking Out Onto Our World

Looking Out onto Our World is a compilation of largely introspective poems that takes us to T. P. Graf’s homeland along a spiritual journey across life’s most unexpected moments juxtaposed with more recent world events. T. P. Graf’s poems are alive with sensory experience, and refuse standard conventions of storytelling.

His verses are crowded and confident, bringing together sequences of characteristically long and winding poems, with shorter, punchier entries and brief narrative explanation. Each word in each verse is deliberate, as if arranged for maximum impact. There’s a heavy social critique to many of the poems, and a detached tone that describes “Predatory drones drone on night and day. Any vestige of dignity long removed. Eden obliterated by fire for profit.” And that sense is broadly on display in poem after poem.

Themes are revisited with similar language to explore a wide world of thought, but it’s hard to find the same sense of deep feeling in each. Though the book’s verse is not particularly complex, it is gripping and compelling, and will engage even the most reluctant poetry reader. The poems are accessible, relatable and without pretense, confronting their audience with what it means to look at our world, with all its agonizing complexity. The truths are surprising, but then, whose truths are they? The casualties’ of long wars on overseas soil, or our distant author’s? Is T. P. Graf true to his own voice and his own sense of what constitutes poetry, or do the verses transcend it?

Pages: 244 | ASIN: B08C5LN91L

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About Literary Titan

The Literary Titan is an organization of professional editors, writers, and professors that have a passion for the written word. We review fiction and non-fiction books in many different genres, as well as conduct author interviews, and recognize talented authors with our Literary Book Award. We are privileged to work with so many creative authors around the globe.

Posted on October 10, 2020, in Book Reviews, Four Stars and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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