In The Wild

Daniel V. Meier Jr.
Daniel V. Meier Jr. Author Interview

Bloodroot follows one man’s story of survival in America’s earliest settlement. What inspired you to write a book about Jamestown in 1609?

I’ve always been a history buff, and I majored in History in college. Jamestown is not far from where I ended up living, so I could imagine what life was like for both the Algonquins and the settlers. I began to imagine what it would be like for a young man raised in a civilized country like England to suddenly have to survive in a wilderness with no amenities.

What were some ideas that guided Matthew’s character development?

I wanted Matthew to be of the working class with working class values. He is practical, and as such chose carpentry as a profession where work would be easily available. This is accentuated by the contrast with his friend Richard’s scholarly pursuits and who ultimately could not survive in the wild environment.

I enjoyed the well defined historical aspects of this book. What kind of research did you undertake to ensure the story was accurate?

I took many trips to Jamestown and studied the architectural reconstructed site, and I was able to make use of much of the historical data they have to offer. I also took advantage of several written accounts in libraries and online to acquire the names of the ships and their captains for the first, second and third supply missions. Everywhere I read, there was a fascinating account of Captain John Smith and the various presidents and governors of the fledgling colony. It was a joy to research.

What is the next book that you are working on and when will it be available?

I have just finished the final edit with my publisher of Blood Before Dawn, the sequel to The Dung Beetles of Liberia. This book focuses on the bloody coup d’état and murder of President Tolbert and will be available December 1, 2021.

Author Links: Website | GoodReads | Facebook | Twitter

A gripping account of survival in America’s earliest settlement, Jamestown, Virginia.

Virginia, 1622. Powhatan warriors prepare war plant from the sacred juice of the bloodroot plant, but Nehiegh, The English son-in-law of Chief Ochawintan has sworn never to kill again. He must leave before the massacre.

England 1609. Matthew did not trust his friend, Richard’s stories of Paradise in the Jamestown settlement, but nothing could have equipped him for the violence and privation that awaited him in this savage land.

Once ashore in the fledging settlement, Matthew experiences the unimaginable beauty of this pristine land and learns the meaning of hope, but it all turns into a nightmare as gold mania infests the community and Indians become an increasing threat. The nightmare only gets worse as the harsh winter brings on “the starving time” and all the grizzly horrors of a desperate and dying community that come with it.

Driven to the depths of despair by the guilt of his sins against Richard and his lust for that man’s wife, Matthew seeks death.

In that moment of crisis, when he chooses death over a life of depravity, he unexpectedly finds new life among his sworn enemy, the Powhatan Indians.

What will this new life mean for Matthew, and will he survive?

About Literary Titan

The Literary Titan is an organization of professional editors, writers, and professors that have a passion for the written word. We review fiction and non-fiction books in many different genres, as well as conduct author interviews, and recognize talented authors with our Literary Book Award. We are privileged to work with so many creative authors around the globe.

Posted on May 30, 2021, in Interviews and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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