An Interesting Contrast

May be an image of one or more people, outdoors and text that says 'PIKSATRU through Telling piksatru.com and stories pictures. print WWW.'
Paul Richardson Author Interview

Fetch follows a toy that acquires artificial intelligence and goes on a journey where he learns of loyalty, laughter, and love. What was the inspiration for the setup to your story?

I was inspired by my grandchildren’s interest in gaming and the characters and stories these games engaged them with. I thought the concept of developing a real-life toy which could enter a game and communicate with children was a unique and interesting perspective to take.

The characters in your book are interesting and well developed. What were some driving ideals behind your character’s development?

I wanted children and young adults to feel like they could get to know the characters and therefore support and engage with them.

What were some themes that were important for you to explore in this book?

I looked at the issue of sibling rivalry. On one hand, Victor and Victoria Nerdie were competitive because they strived for personal dominance over each other, beyond the material world they had grown up in. On the other hand, Sam and Samantha Perret, whose worlds had been handed many tough calls, were not competitive. It paints an interesting contrast between the privileged and non-privileged of society.

Also, the theme of Artificial Intelligence is one that children of today will live with in its many potential forms. The humanisation of Fetch is a likelihood which children who read the story will inevitably face.

What is the next book that you are working on and when will it be available?

I am working on an adult fiction story to complete my trilogy of adventure stories set in Papua New Guinea. I am also at the editing stage of a joint project with co -author Dion Mayne. The book is the historical fiction novel, Masquerade Gold, and is the companion novel to Boomerang Gold.

Author Links: Twitter | Facebook | Website

Each year In Venture Industries promoted a unique Christmas toy. Since graduating from university, Victor Nerdie, and sister Victoria, had submitted a creation, each believing, theirs would be the chosen toy. With Victor being the successor on all previous occasions, Victoria believed, finally, this year, she had created a winner with the realistic fox terrier she called Fetch. She was unaware the President of IVI, Victor and Victoria’s grandfather, had already agreed a third-party product would be that year’s annual Christmas toy. Disappointed her technologically advanced offering had been outbid Victoria threw the toy away and quit the company. However, she did not realise her brother had tampered with Fetch before she had disposed of it. Victor stayed on and helped produce a computer game that promoted a new product called Puzzle Flakes. With a prize of one million dollars attached, the game was a hit around the world. Unbeknown to the Nerdies, the discarded Fetch had found a new home with ten-year-old Sam and Samantha Perrett. No longer a simple chase and retrieve toy, Fetch’s acquired artificial intelligence led to adventures in both the real and the virtual world. Fetch’s desire to please took the toy on a physics-defying mission into the heart and soul of the Puzzle Land computer game. Despite being a machine Fetch learns about loyalty and laughter and, over time, it learned about the power of love.

About Literary Titan

The Literary Titan is an organization of professional editors, writers, and professors that have a passion for the written word. We review fiction and non-fiction books in many different genres, as well as conduct author interviews, and recognize talented authors with our Literary Book Award. We are privileged to work with so many creative authors around the globe.

Posted on March 20, 2021, in Interviews and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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