Blog Archives

Annual Scurfpea Publishing Poetry Anthology

Jennifer LeBlanc Author Interview

Jennifer LeBlanc Author Interview

Without Fear of Infamy is an anthology of poetry published by Scurfpea Publishing. What was the collaboration process like on this anthology?

It’s a very competitive submission process and I am very thankful that a few of my poems were chosen for this new anthology. Collaboration has been a great learning experience for me as a writer and I can’t wait to see what comes next.

My favorite poem was Be Every Color of the Sun. What inspired this piece?

IT came from a rare feeling of positive self-esteem I was experiencing at the time. I think this makes it stand out because a lot of us struggle daily to find those moments in our lives.

Besides your own, what is your favorite poem from the collection?

One of my favorites is Tempering Grief by Brit Graham. I really love her vivid descriptors and her overall style of writing. This one stood out to me as one I could personally relate to having experienced heartbreak in the same manner before in my own life.

Author Links: GoodReads | Twitter | Facebook | Website

Each year since 2010, Scurfpea Publishing has produced an anthology of poems. It’s a juried competition with a different editor each year and no entry fee; consequently, each anthology has a distinct flavor all its own. This anthology includes poems by: Charles Luden, Katie Alexander, Steve Boint, Lin Brummels, Raymond Byrnes, Jennifer Carr, Craig Challender, Susan Spaeth Cherry, Kevin Cole, Jason Freeman, Jerome Freeman, Brit Graham, Monica Gulbrandson, Roberta Haar, Carol Hamilton, Constance Hoffman, Brenda K. Johnson, Leone Kayl, Ivanna Kusijanovic, Jennifer LeBlanc, Charles Luden, Mary Ann Marko, Elissa Mittman, Marsha Mittman, Rosemary Dunn Moeller, Marcella Prokop, Larry Person, Marcella Remund, Lisa Rinaldo, Bruce Roseland, Barbara Schmitz, Dan Snethen, Gloria Sofia, Brad Soule, Jennifer Soule, Linda Duede Starbuck, Douglas Starr, G.M.H. Thompson, Norma C. Wilson, June Tuff Witte, and Susan Zueger.

Buy Now From B&N.com

Without Fear of Infamy

This is a collection of poems from different poets. You can tell when there is a change from one poet to another because of the distinct tone and stylistic change. Each poet brings their unique life experiences, view, perceptions and even temperament. Just like every other edition before this one, this book exhibits a unique collection of poets, each with their own tundra but somehow coming together seamlessly. Some works stand out more than others though.

Charles Luden opens in the first chapter. His second entry ‘Glory’ is an evocatively seductive and brief thought about a difficult time and the end of it. It is a reflection of the journey rather than the destination. Charles has said very much with very little. This entry dignifies the phrase ‘short and sweet’. His entry ‘Last Laugh’ stands out too with its painfully awakening truth.

Further into the book you encounter Brit Graham with ‘Tempering Grief’ which is an account of the unstable and aimless emotions of grief. The raw pain is seen through the choice of words. Then you get to the ‘Recipe for Forgiveness’ which is a simple guide that the world needs in these times of intentional genocide and blatant hatred.

We’re also treated with a guide to coexisting with others from Marsha Mittman’s NYC Observation. It speaks to the tolerance people should direct at other people. This entry is thought provoking and candid if not a little shaming to us as human beings.

‘Ideological Exile’ by Ivanna Kusijanovic is perhaps one of the most serious poems in this anthology. It reads like a personal inner voice chastising you and pushing you to be better, to do better. If you would like to read one piece first before going through the book from the start, this is a good one to jump to.

These are just a few, there are many more evocative, thought provoking, some so wonderfully heartbreaking. This is a collection of poems about life, death and everything in between. From the pain to the joy to untold suffering. It is a cornucopia of experience from the start to the very end. The title is a lovely homage to Dante as well as fitting to the choice of works featured in the book.

However, a few pieces seem to be misplaced in terms of the general depth of the poems. This could be intentional to provide a break from the intense emotion. All in all, the editors have done a good job.

Pages: 158 | ISBN: 1088987613

Buy Now From B&N.com

%d bloggers like this: