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Trip to America

Trip To America by [Liana Margiva]

Poetry is an interesting genre because one can interpret the words in more than one way. Poems are charming to read and also help one understand the perspective of the author. Trip To America is filled with excellent poems that one would want to read every day. Some poems are long and still exciting to read. The book is a beautiful addition to literature and great material to encourage the reading culture. The author is gentle with her words and embraces a modest tone through most parts of the book. The use of imagery, symbolism, sarcasm, and other literary stylistic devices together with the author’s astounding writing make Trip To America a future classic.

Liana Margiva writes from her heart. Her words can be felt by any reader and her message is perfectly understood. Some of the poems felt like monologues as the author made them personal. I enjoyed reading these types of poems as it enabled me to know how Liana Margiva’s mind worked. Some of the lines and phrases in the poem evoked strong emotions, some sad while others are happy. I loved reading the happy texts as much as those that had a melancholy mood. For the latter, I could feel the author’s state of mind as she penned the words.

Trip to America contains dozens of poems that anyone would love. I have a couple of pieces that I think every poetry lover should read. The first poem is among my favorites. The poem ‘Don’t Look into My Eyes’ is great because it helps us understand why it is important to have a listening ear. in the first half of the poem, we have the persona in the poem list down reasons why no one should look into their eyes. As you keep on reading, the persona later changes and says it is time to look into their eyes. I found the question and answer style in the poem to be a unique feature that would not only be appealing to the reader but also make them understand the subject matter of the poem better.

Other poems that I thoroughly enjoyed in the book were ‘To George Mateos’, ‘Don’t Call, Don’t Seek’, ‘Blue Eyes’, Pray, Linger, Soul!’, and ‘Black September’. Getting to chapter 78 was a pleasant surprise as this is where the transition from stanzas to prose happened. Reading the poems was a great experience but getting to read this beautiful narration in full sentences made Trip to America even more intriguing. One gets absorbed by the story as Liana Margiva’s narrating style is too great to not enjoy. The characters are intriguing and the storylines thrilling. The author is engaging throughout the book, making the reading experience fun and exciting. I recommend it to any reader that enjoys both poetry and prose writing.

Pages: 601 | ASIN: B08FMPV71X

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British Marine Engineer – Trailer

Two days later Douglas called Lorena his best friend ever. His words touched Lorena deeply, she sat staring into the front yard through the glass door, thinking of Douglas. Little did she know then that she would never be able to shut him out of her soul, that he would always be beside her, in her dreams. The cage she was confined to, albeit temporarily, hardly brought Lorena any joy, but it couldn’t prevent her from being carried away in her dream to the ocean beach next to Douglas. They were on the beach, side by side, Lorena’s eyes fixated on Douglas’s smiley face. Unable to speek, mesmerized by his presence, Lorena longed to touch his cheek, caress his face, but resisted the urge. After a while, feeling emboldened, she uttered in a low voice, almost whispered:

“May I touch your face?” Douglas kept on staring at her, smiling smartly, as if knowing what was happening in Lorena’s soul.
“Certainly”, he whispered back and smiled again.

Lorena reached out slowly and run her shaky fingers gently across his cheek. Douglas kept smiling, then took Lorena by the hand and looked straight into her eyes. He then reached out with his own hand and touched Lorena’s cheek, leaned over and gently kissed her on the lips. Lorena closed her eyes, she wanted to save this memory to be able to savor it, to warm her soul once she became lonely once again.

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