The Mad Scientists of Planet Terrorista

The Mad Scientists of Planet Terrorista seems a bit of a mouthful and I thought the plot would be outrageous. As it turns out the plot is outrageous, but surprisingly that does not equate to being terrible and I found myself to be enjoying the story line and characters right from the start.

The story picks up immediately after Hyacinth’s incredibly advanced daughter, Bella, goes missing. Hyacinth hires none other than Sherlock Holmes (who has been cryogenically frozen for a number of years) to help her track down her daughter’s whereabouts. It takes a decade, but eventually Sherlock does locate Bella, who lives on another planet and now goes by the name Brazillia. Holmes enlists the help of Hercules Poirot (say what?!) to help him come up with a magical disguise for Hyacinth to wear on planet Terrorista in order to see her daughter. This disguise ends up being an “interplanetary everlasting butterfly” that allows Hyacinth to travel with ease between her home planet, Debonnaire, and Terrorista. Hyacinth uses her disguise to gain access to the facility that Bella is kept in with many other abducted children, and discovers that the mad scientists have been doing medical testing on the children. Having been subjected to all kinds of untested and unsafe drugs, Bella is in a pitifully unhealthy physical and mental state. If that isn’t a crazy way to kick off a story, I don’t know what is!

From this point, the story continues on with Hyacinth rebuilding her relationship with Bella and trying to help her regain her health and freedom. The story is fast paced and rather abrupt in places, but this is clearly due to it being written as a television script and not a novel. The entirety of the script includes lots of outside references to characters from other stories (Holmes and Poirot, obviously) and a lot of really clever word-play (such as the radio station ‘siriusly sinatra’) that make the story interesting and fun to read. On a more somber note, the story is really about mental illness and encouraging people to see those who suffer from mental illness differently. Mainly, to see them as worthwhile and beneficial to society rather than simply a burden.

My only real complaint about the story is that the inclusion of Sherlock Holmes and Poirot, (while initially drawing me into the plot), don’t seem to really fit in the story. Both are famous crime solvers, sure, but do they fit into an interplanetary story line? I am not so sure. Still, while seeming oddly out of place, the characters no doubt make the story better and are essential to the plot. I would venture to say that those characters would be just as worthy with different names. I still really enjoyed the whole thing.

Pages: 484 | ISBN: 1387010484

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About Literary Titan

The Literary Titan is an organization of professional editors, writers, and professors that have a passion for the written word. We review fiction and non-fiction books in many different genres, as well as conduct author interviews, and recognize talented authors with our Literary Book Award. We are privileged to work with so many creative authors around the globe.

Posted on February 27, 2019, in Book Reviews, Four Stars and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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