Let’s Talk! A Story of Autism and Friendship

Let’s Talk! A Story of Autism and Friendship, by Lisa Jacovsky is a fun and educational children’s story about a little girl named Harper. While at the pool one day, she meets a girl named Emma. She tries to talk and play with her, but she notices something’s off. Emma doesn’t speak, and she just stands there, flapping her arms. Harper offers to play in the pool with Emma and once she does, she learns that Emma has autism! Even after knowing why Emma behaved the way she did, she didn’t mind and Emma still became her best friend.

Let’s Talk! A Story of Autism and Friendship is a light-hearted and engaging story that teaches young readers a valuable life lesson. Author Lisa Jacovsky is able to write about a sensitive topic while keeping it easy for kids to understand. The colorful and detailed illustrations allow for the reader to better visualize the story and the characters. I really enjoyed how the story shows what it is like to have a friend with autism, letting the audience know that they may think differently, but they are still fun people to be around!

Let’s Talk! A Story of Autism and Friendship is a touching and easy to read picture book that will make it easy for parents and teachers to begin a discussion about autism with children. It teaches kids about the importance of accepting others and learning how to make them feel more comfortable, and Lisa Jacovsky does it all within an entertaining story.

Pages: 14 | ASIN: B08CBDT71J

Buy Now From B&N.com

 

About Literary Titan

The Literary Titan is an organization of professional editors, writers, and professors that have a passion for the written word. We review fiction and non-fiction books in many different genres, as well as conduct author interviews, and recognize talented authors with our Literary Book Award. We are privileged to work with so many creative authors around the globe.

Posted on March 10, 2021, in Book Reviews, Five Stars and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. There is huuuge gap between what people have learned about near-diversity, and responding suitably. Between knowing about it and being able to recognise it.
    Corrine Duyvis, the Dutch writer’s book The Edge of Gone http://www.thinkingautismguide.com/2016/04/on-edge-of-gone-corinne-duyvis-on-post.html
    has received many plaudits. Her book, however, is difficult to get hold of, and has been panned because it does not read right. It is a neuro-diverse written book. It should not be judged solely on non-diverse bases.
    There is still so far to go.

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