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The Most Important Asset

Mari Ryan
Mari Ryan Author Interview

The Thriving Hive provides readers with guidance on creating a work culture that is both satisfied and motivated. Why was this an important book for you to write?

All too often we hear about employee disengagement and high turnover rates. Both of these issues cost employers millions of dollars a year. When employees have an experience at work where they feel connected to the purpose of the organization and feel they are cared for, they are more likely to both be engaged and stay with the organization. In writing this book, I hoped to show leaders and managers that they can create a workplace where both the employees and the business thrive.

What do you find is a common misconception leaders have about employees roles in companies?

In many organizations, employees are treated as assets that are there to be used up and discarded. Without your employees, you can’t achieve your business objectives. Employees are an asset, but need to be viewed as the most important asset of an organization.

You are a workplace well-being strategist and CEO of Advancing Wellness. How has your experience helped you write this book?

I’ve spent my entire career in business, with experiences in organizations from some of the largest, most notable companies in the world to very small businesses. I’ve seen the good, the bad and, yes, even the ugly.

What do you hope is one thing readers take away from your book?

The one thing I hope readers take away is that they can influence their own organization to create a workplace where well-being is a core value and that caring for their people is a key priority.

Author Links: Twitter | Facebook | Website

Mari Ryan, a workplace well-being strategist, tells a simple, yet insightful story in The Thriving Hive: How People-Centric Workplaces Ignite Engagement and Fuel Results. A first-time CEO realizes her organization is no longer attracting and retaining the kinds of employees they need to remain competitive and keep their customers happy. She seeks help from a mentor, the retired former CEO. With his unconventional insights, he introduces her to two very different beehive workplace cultures and how they deal with adversity.

Replete with interesting characters, the parable takes you on a journey as the bees experience hive-threatening situations. The story looks at the organizational behavior, how leadership and their management teams can create workplace cultures that diminish or support the well-being of their employees. You’ll meet the management teams and worker bees that represent typical employees in any business.

Readers join the CEO in learning about:

o Putting employee wellness first to revitalize a company

o The economic benefits of a people-centric workplace

o Creating a workplace culture with organizational behaviors that encourage organizational well-being

o Implementing structural adjustments that support employee engagement

o Strategic viewpoints and tactical practices for enhancing employee well-being

This is a quick read for anyone who wants guidance for creating a culture of well-being, purpose, vitality, and satisfaction, for an all-encompassing employee experience.

The Thriving Hive: How People-Centric Workplaces Ignite Engagement and Fuel Results

The Thriving Hive: How People-Centric Workplaces Ignite Engagement and Fuel Results by [Mari Ryan]

Anyone who has observed workplace trends and how employees in a company mingle while working together will agree that Mari Ryan wrote an informative book. The author bases all the information in the book on facts, experience, and years of research. The Thriving Hive gives you an insight into how different workplace cultures influence the productivity of employees and the rate by which companies grow. Organizations just like any entities need a specific framework to be run and a set of rules to be followed. If the management of the company puts minimum effort, then, the employees will reciprocate. The energy shown in company leadership has a huge effect on how the employees work.

In The Thriving Hive Mari Ryan talks about various types of employees, how the workplace can be a place of growth and the foundation for long-lasting goals and friendships. When reading this book, you realize that the workplace does not need to be too serious. A little fun and lightening up is allowed as long as everyone is taking care of their duties.

Through Mari Ryan’s personal experience, the reader learns how important it is for one to start their career in a warm and friendly workplace. The author writes about their lovely experiences which are encouraging. Working around people who show love and concern especially for junior employees is a pipe dream for many. Most times, seniors at a company tend to show juniors contempt due to their lack of experience and sometimes financial status. This should never be the case.

While reading this book, the general impression one gets is that the author is addressing the heads of companies and the management. Mari Ryan has solid advice for CEOs, managers, human resources, heads of departments, and all staff with senior positions. The message being reiterated throughout the book is that company heads should put their employees first. This includes employees from the lowest levels like janitors and messengers to those that hold the highest positions. Mari Ryan encourages organizations to treat their workers with dignity and in turn, they will get the best services from the employees. A happy employee will ensure that your client is also happy. This will lead to an increase in clients and thus growth of the company.

One notable thing in the book other than the solid advice is the beautiful storytelling done by the author. The narration skills are both modest and enthralling. The thriving Hive is for everyone in a leadership position or those aspiring to be leaders. This book will help business executives improve their administration skills and help shape the organizations that they head.

Pages: 234 | ASIN: B07H3879LT

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