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When The Patient Is Not The Sick One!

Vera Mortina: When the patient is not the sick one! (Dangerous Doctors Series) by [Markov, Dimitri]

Dimitri Markov Author Interview

Vera Mortina is a medical fiction novel about a sordid doctor that begins work at a medical practice where strange and deadly things begin to happen. The tag line, ‘when the patient is not the sick one’, is chillingly appropriate. What was your inspiration for Dr. Vera Mortina’s character and her troubled disposition?

I interact with a number of professionals who have rather troubling dispositions, some are physicians, some are nurses, administrators, patients, lawyers and others. How little do we really know about those “difficult” people we have to work with every day? This led to a fictional account developed on the theme of Dangerous Doctors.

There was a lot of time spent crafting the character traits in this novel. What was the most important factor for you to get right in your characters?

The most difficult and yet the most crucial characteristic of Dr Vera Mortina was to convincingly portray how she could function so well as a medical professional and yet be so dangerously disturbed. How she could create such a believable façade that even her partner wanted to get closer to her, and not run away. Her partner was so skilled in his profession, yet he was really blind for a long time, he was drawn to Dr Vera like a moth attracted to the candle light.

I felt that there were a lot of great twists and turns throughout the novel. Did you plan this before writing the novel, or did the twists present themselves as you were writing?

I conceived the general outline and worked on the development as a thought project for a long time before writing it down and developing from an outline. It all revolved around Dr Vera, and she led me to uncover some of the dangerous things she was really up to.

Vera Mortina is a part of your Dangerous Doctors series. What will the next book in that series be about and when will it be published?

At this point, my writing efforts are going to frequently revisiting the writing of the other three Dangerous Doctors, to refine the presentations and address many of the questions you asked above. This includes the theme of excess commercialization of in vitro fertilization clinics in The Surrogate, how the paranoia of aging could effect a physician in Her Charm was Contageous, and the relentless desire for immortality and money in a biotech researcher in BloodBird. Fostering believability is always an issue.

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Vera MortinaChosen in a rush, Dr. Vera Mortina joins a small medical group, but without adequate exploration of her rather unusual background. Her sudden arrival is accompanied by acrimony, odd and disturbing idiosyncratic behaviors, and the unexpected deaths of several patients and staff. The closer Dr. Richard Bates looks into Vera, with her violent thoughts and bizarre hobbies, the more imperiled his own life becomes.

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Vera Mortina | Dangerous Doctors

Vera Mortina continues the Dangerous Doctors Series by Dimitri Markov. The story is about Dr. Vera Mortina who has a sordid background.  She was chosen to be a part of a medical group, but the staff did not delve into her background to find out more about her. Soon after she starts work at the practice she begins to display odd and troubling behaviors. Patients die in mysterious ways after her arrival. When Dr. Richard Bates begins to look into his partner’s past he discovers thoughts of violent behaviors and savage hobbies. And now he knows too much. His life is in danger.

The idea for this spine-chilling medical fiction is interesting. The character descriptions in this novel were fantastic. Markov’s descriptions are detailed and vivid; one can easily picture the characters and their surroundings. There is a lot of time spent crafting what each character felt and thought about each other. In any fiction story where the character is emotionally disturbed it’s important to have a fully realized character that readers can understand, if not sympathize. Dr. Vera Mortina was very well executed in the characters development and display of odd behaviors.

The story itself is interesting, gripping and holds the reader’s attention throughout the novel. There is a life or death situation or choice to be made at every page turn. I enjoyed the suspense in this novel, I was never sure where the characters would end up and the thrill kept me at the edge of my seat. It is not predictable, honestly I thought it would be when I began the story, but there were moments when I was pleasantly surprised. It is evident that a lot of time and care went into crafting this story, it just needs a few more edits.

Vera Mortina has a lot of potential and could be an exceptional book.

Pages:  419 | ASIN: B01B0MS6DO

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Dangerous Doctors Series

The SurrogateThe Surrogate is a medical thriller about a nurse that undergoes in vitro fertilization and then realizes that some of her eggs have been stolen. This sets off a dramatic chain of events. What was your inspiration for creating a medical thriller involving IVF?

IVF is an area that has a lot of mystique and attraction, especially to women. Some become either more concentrated or fixed on having a baby or obsessed with having a baby in some cases. It is also big business, which is not something that a lot of people are aware of. The potential for the problems described in The Surrogate definitely exists. And I didn’t even address issues with sex-selective abortion and selecting for certain characteristics such as intelligence, strength, attractiveness.

Through the story Marina is fighting against corporate greed. Do you think that corporate greed is prevalent in real world medicine?

Corporate greed is definitely present in real medicine, great examples are elective surgical procedures, IVF, cosmetic surgery, medication prices, and executive salaries at nonprofit hospitals.

In the book synopsis you state that IVF is in a ‘very corporate world’. Do you think there is anything in The Surrogate that can only happen in a story? Is there anything in your book that you think happens in real life?

While I cannot comment on what actually happens in real life, I can definitely say that the potential for much of the Surrogate exists in real life.

The Surrogate has many well developed characters. What was your favorite character to write for?

My favorite character is Marina because she is a prototype for many people that do work in healthcare field. She was the easiest to develope her complex characteristics and personality.

Book synopsis:

Marina Bonnaserra, a young administrative nurse realizes that her life as a SINK lacks any deeper meaning. Prodded on by a series of piercing comments, she considers having a child. Knowing that the only man in her life is non-committal, and against fatherhood, she explores in vitro fertilization. In the very corporate world of IVF, Marina is stimulated to produce eggs, rapidly assigned an anonymous sperm donor, and awaits implantation. She soon discovers that not all of her fertilized eggs can be accounted for, leading her to a desperate quest against corporate greed to locate her own missing “products of conception.” Can her one passion protect her from her one obsession?

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The Capabilities Of The Mind

Bloodbird is a futuristic novel that explores the possibilities of technological and medical advances. What is your experiences in these fields? Have you always been interested in science and medicine?

I have always been interested in science and medicine. As a practicing physician, I see medicine as it exists and can envision much of where it will be going. Transplant medicine is a very interesting field, with lots of hope for the future. Who knows what is not transplantable today will be done in the future. Certainly, none of the characters in BloodBird could envision the apparent ancillary, unintended and unanticipated transplant which seems to have occurred to Karolena, nor the rather weird transplant that Blutfink ended up getting in the ending. Did Blutfink get his wish granted? Only he will know.

BloodBird is an interesting look into where medical and technological research can expand. What is one medical advancement we have today that you only thought would be science fiction?

Computer chips that are implanted in the brain that are triggering movement of artificial limbs, and maybe facilitating sight.

There is a lot of time and care spent with descriptions and building the setting and tone of the story in Bloodbird. Was this out of necessity to develop the depth of the story or was it something that happened naturally as you were writing?

Both. I felt that the changes in transplant surgery, in medicine, and even in the basic fabric of society needed fleshing out for the reader to appreciate what the near future could bring, and what it would be like to actually live among Karolena and the other characters. Some things changed a lot, but others not at all.

Karolena develops an interesting ability to see events from the past and into the future. Why do you think this ability was important to tell the story? Was there any other abilities you might of used?

Karolena was loosing her sight, and the VAA area of the brain is actually involved in certain aspects of vision, so there is an element of medical plausibility here. Seeing out of the past or into the future is not currently associated medically with the physiologic function of the VAA or of any known function of a body structure, but there is much that we do now know about the capabilities of the mind. BTW, BloodBird was initially titled Second Sight.

Here is a question for YOU the readers. The author would like to ask whether any readers have speculated on the origin on the book’s title? Please post your responses in the comments section below.

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Karolena Kreisler, a young German ex-pat surgeon in North Carolina, develops a worsening of her chronic liver disease, complicated by an unusual loss of vision. She elects to undergo an experimental transplant when a donor “miraculously” becomes available, which seems life and vision saving. Karolena soon develops an unusual ability to “see” events, past and future, and this haunting ability drives her to the truth behind certain high income business ventures at her hospital. The action takes place in the not too distant future, giving the reader a glimpse of what life, research and medicine could soon be like. This is futuristic medical fiction at its best, and will appeal to anyone who has contact with healthcare professionals. Nurses, office staff, paramedics, administrators, doctors and most of all patients will recognize all these characters, their bizarre actions and perhaps relate to their sometimes irrational, emotional behavior. You will be left wondering which parts are fiction, what actually occurred, and what the author left out.

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The Surrogate

The Surrogate“A medical thriller with an interesting plot, three-dimensional characters and many levels of conflict.” – The Hungry Monster Book Review

Marina Bonnaserra, a young administrative nurse realizes that her life as a SINK lacks any deeper meaning. Prodded on by a series of piercing comments, she considers having a child. Knowing that the only man in her life is non-committal, and against fatherhood, she explores in vitro fertilization. In the very corporate world of IVF, Marina is stimulated to produce eggs, rapidly assigned an anonymous sperm donor, and awaits implantation. She soon discovers that not all of her fertilized eggs can be accounted for, leading her to a desperate quest against corporate greed to locate her own missing “products of conception.” Can her one passion protect her from her one obsession?

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Bloodbird

BloodbirdBloodBird by Dimitri Markov is part of his Dangerous Doctors series. It is a futuristic novel that explores the possibilities of technological and medical advances. The novel focuses on a young female doctor named Karolena who discovers her chronic liver disease has worsened as she begins to lose her vision. When an unknown donor is presented, Karolena undergoes an experimental transplant which could save both her life and her vision. After the surgery, Karolena develops an interesting ability to see events from the past and into the future. This newfound ability causes her to find out the truth behind the business operations of her hospital, a truth she may not want to know. She tries to find the answers she desires, but quickly learns she can trust no one.

BloodBird is an interesting look into where medical and technological research can expand. It is an interesting look into what the future could hold. The story is a little slow to begin, but it really picks up as Karolena begins to experience her ‘visions’. The author does a good job and roping the reader into the story with well-developed characters and descriptions. There are some dialogue that comes off as being too cliché such as “I am Penny Forest’s mother, and I am here to avenge her death. I loved her very much.” There are plenty of other ways to say the same thing and garner a reaction from the readers. The novel is a hit and miss when it comes to predictability; some things were predictable but there were other wild plot twists that take the reader by surprise. Couple that with Markov’s ability to create complex and interesting characters and you’ll easily lose track of time as your furiously flipping through pages.

Markov spends a lot of time with descriptions and building the setting and tone of the story. He has a unique way of telling his story and getting the readers engaged into the story. At times it feels like he prolongs the story on purpose to make the reader more interested. While these moments seem to drag on, I continued to read the story because of a strong connection to the characters that made me want to find out where the tale will take them. The author creates an interesting futuristic world with things that seem like science fiction, like the transference of people’s memories, and makes them ever so subtly believable.

I would recommend this book to those who enjoy future novels, medical experimentation novels, even those who enjoy mysteries. I think BloodBird by Dimitri Markov is a genre crossing novel that would appeal to a variety of people looking for an entertaining read on late nights. It’s slow to develop, but delivers a lot.

Pages: 450 | ISBN: 1517707617

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