A Call to Win the Third War of Independence of Haiti

A call to win the third war of independence of Haiti by [Etienne, Ernst]

A Call to Win the Third War of Independence of Haiti is a summary of the history of the island, taking us on a journey starting all the way back from the pre-Columbus times to the modern era. Ernst Etienne takes a distinctly patriotic approach during this condensed, 80 odd page long book, but also provides a very practical overview of a little known history of Haiti. Etienne rounds up his book with his view of the reasons for the downfall of the nation and the ways it could get back to its feet.

Ernst Etienne take on the early history of the island is highly romanticized. Pre-Columbian settlers of the island, one would gather from the pages, lived in idyllic societies without any problems. The cause of all ills of Haiti is the white man, one would gather from this book. Depending on the political views of the reader, Etienne’s view of historical and current events will have to be interpreted by every reader individually, depending on political views that he or she has.

Despite that, the book has some elements that make it universally valuable. Etienne’s recounting of the history of Haiti is well done, following a simple and understandable chronological structure. He points out important events in the history of the island and paints a clear picture of the reasons they happened. He is also relatively unbiased when recounting some of these events, often naming the atrocities done by the islanders themselves.

The highlights of the book are the recounting of military events that littered the small nation. Etienne’s description of the war that Haiti had with the powerful nation of France, and the eventual victory, is a fascinating tale. Another valuable part of the book is the description of The Citadel Laferri’re, a magnificent fortress that was turned into a World Heritage Site in 1982.

The last part of the book covers the downfall of the Haitian nation. Ernst Etienne recognizes that most of the problems of Haiti stem from the population itself. He preaches unity for his people, urging them to unite under the singular goal of creating a powerful nation.

He delves into the root of problems for Haitians through the examination of events done a hundred years ago or more – a common theme in nationalistic works. Then, he shifts to his vision of the future of Haiti, explaining how making his nation prosperous will not only serve the population of the island but the world at large. His proposed policies will, yet again, have to be judged by the reader individually, as they do have a particular political and economic angle to them.

A Call to Win the Third War of Independence of Haiti is a good intro into the history and the current situation of the nation of Haiti. While it does take a distinct point of view of historical and current events, it is a concise and fast read, worth the invested time.

Pages: 88 | ASIN: B07D1YJ1D6

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About Literary Titan

The Literary Titan is a book review website which consists of mostly fiction books, but we do enjoy non fiction works that we're excited about. All reviews are the reviewer’s honest opinion. We love books and read constantly (seriously, it’s an addiction). We're always open to book review requests and have aspirations of one day being sucked into the Twilight Zone episode with Burgess Meredith where all he wants to do is read, but can’t until the world ends; you know what I mean? www.LiteraryTitan.com

Posted on June 28, 2018, in Book Reviews, Three Stars and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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