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A Call to Win the Third War of Independence of Haiti

A call to win the third war of independence of Haiti by [Etienne, Ernst]

A Call to Win the Third War of Independence of Haiti is a summary of the history of the island, taking us on a journey starting all the way back from the pre-Columbus times to the modern era. Ernst Etienne takes a distinctly patriotic approach during this condensed, 80 odd page long book, but also provides a very practical overview of a little known history of Haiti. Etienne rounds up his book with his view of the reasons for the downfall of the nation and the ways it could get back to its feet.

Ernst Etienne take on the early history of the island is highly romanticized. Pre-Columbian settlers of the island, one would gather from the pages, lived in idyllic societies without any problems. The cause of all ills of Haiti is the white man, one would gather from this book. Depending on the political views of the reader, Etienne’s view of historical and current events will have to be interpreted by every reader individually, depending on political views that he or she has.

Despite that, the book has some elements that make it universally valuable. Etienne’s recounting of the history of Haiti is well done, following a simple and understandable chronological structure. He points out important events in the history of the island and paints a clear picture of the reasons they happened. He is also relatively unbiased when recounting some of these events, often naming the atrocities done by the islanders themselves.

The highlights of the book are the recounting of military events that littered the small nation. Etienne’s description of the war that Haiti had with the powerful nation of France, and the eventual victory, is a fascinating tale. Another valuable part of the book is the description of The Citadel Laferri’re, a magnificent fortress that was turned into a World Heritage Site in 1982.

The last part of the book covers the downfall of the Haitian nation. Ernst Etienne recognizes that most of the problems of Haiti stem from the population itself. He preaches unity for his people, urging them to unite under the singular goal of creating a powerful nation.

He delves into the root of problems for Haitians through the examination of events done a hundred years ago or more – a common theme in nationalistic works. Then, he shifts to his vision of the future of Haiti, explaining how making his nation prosperous will not only serve the population of the island but the world at large. His proposed policies will, yet again, have to be judged by the reader individually, as they do have a particular political and economic angle to them.

A Call to Win the Third War of Independence of Haiti is a good intro into the history and the current situation of the nation of Haiti. While it does take a distinct point of view of historical and current events, it is a concise and fast read, worth the invested time.

Pages: 88 | ASIN: B07D1YJ1D6

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The Ice Factory

The Ice Factory by [Phillips, Jason Roger]

The Ice Factory is an entertaining book by author Jason Phillips. It tells the story of hurricane Edna which hit the Caribbean Islands in 1954. The book is written with multiple perspectives focusing on Joy, who lived in Grenada which was decimated by the hurricane, and Audrey, who lives in Trinidad, which was less affected. Joy, the owner of an ice factory, was killed during the storm. Audrey is her niece and closest living relative.

“And when my soul got to the front gates I took my place in the queue. I think I recognized some faces, it’s true. Just in front of me, I saw some people looking very excited, very happy to be here and I even overheard someone talking about someone named Joy … talking about what happened, how it happened, and what then came to pass. This is what I heard them say…”

The entire first chapter, particularly this paragraph, captured my interest in the book. The first chapter did an exceptional job of peeking my interest in the story to come with its beautiful language and its unique character perspective. Having one of your characters speaking from beyond the grave, giving their perspective on the living world is an interesting and fun way to approach a story.

I loved reading the differences and similarities between the way Joy and Audrey viewed the world. They were both strong characters in their own way and met the balance between uniquely interesting and relatable. Both deal with struggles on different levels and approach the way they deal with those difficulties differently but maintain their strength throughout. I found switching back and forth between them to work really well with the story being told. I also liked the focus the book puts on family and the close connections families can have, along with their struggles.

The book kept a good pace as the reader is taken through the characters lives. It balances the dramatic events of the book, like the hurricane, and its effect on the characters’ lives, as well as the smaller struggles of daily life. The book did a great job of making you care about the characters, as the driving force of the plot. Phillips did a masterful job with the entire book of creating distinctive voices in his characters, setting a scene, and grasping a tone for the whole book that placed you in a place, time, and culture.

From beginning to end The Ice Factory is a fun, engaging, interesting, and uplifting story that kept me invested in the story throughout. The characters were well written and fleshed out, keeping me rooting for them the whole time. I enjoyed this book very much and am excited to see what else this author puts forth. I would definitely recommend this book.

Pages: 270 | ASIN: B01MEBVXVY

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The Conflicts That Followed

Daniel Peter Buckley Author Interview

Daniel Peter Buckley Author Interview

Sicania Rising is a genre-crossing novel with elements of a fantasy, history, and adventure as well. Did you start writing with this in mind, or did this happen organically as you were writing?

My aim was to write a novel embracing events from an earlier time period that had not been explored. Drawing on the legendary battle of Camicus and the siege by the Minoan fleets provided the novel with a solid central theme to build upon. However, the novel during the adding of the campaigns drew on the beliefs of those involved giving the story a vibrancy that evolved during the conflicts that followed.

The supporting characters in this novel, I felt, were intriguing and well developed. Who was your favorite character to write for?

Thanks for the positive comments. It was challenging drawing together the character’s and rewarding when they developed their roles within the novel. Because of the historical background, Sancunthian he supported other figures such as Paiawon and Rhadys adding new layers to the novel.

I enjoyed the detail and historical accuracy of the novel. Did you do a lot of research to maintain accuracy of the subject?

Yes the book required a lot of research that involved all the figures within the novel covering books from my own library and the purchase of new books. Having visited Sicily and Crete several times it allowed me to build a clear picture of the islands when writing about the varied locations used within the novel.

Author Links: Webiste | Twitter | Facebook

JOURNEY BACK IN TIME AND FOLLOW THE CAMPAIGNS IN THE WESTERN SEAS FOR CONTROL OF THE ANCIENT SEA TRADE ROUTES AND THE POWER, RICHES AND CONTROL IT DELIVERS. PHAECIAN SEA CAPTAINS LED BY PAIAWON, AEACUS AND RHADYS BATTLE WITH ARIUKKI, KOKALUS, THESANIS, ENNA and CARAUSIUS. FOLLOWING THE PASSING OFF HAMMURABI THE ANCIENT WORLD SAW THE LEADING POWERS BATTLE TO CONTROL THEIR BORDERS AND LANDS AS THE CITY STATES IN THE EAST FOUGHT BITTER INTER- CITY STATE WARS PROTECTING THEIR VITAL TRADE ROUTES AND SECURING ALLIANCES. WITH THE WESTERN SEA TRADE ROUTES OFFERING NEW MARKETS AND RESOURCES THE RIVAL POWERS ALL LOOKED WEST AND THE ISLAND OF SICANIA WITH ENVIOUS EYES.
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Voodoo Child

Voodoo Child (Zombie Uprising, #1)4 StarsWilliam Burke’s Voodoo Child is an engaging, if not slightly creepy, adventure to a tropical island plagued by greed, witchcraft and humanity. With Maggie Child as our main character, this strong female lead finds her life turned upside down when a tour in Iraq ends up landing her in a research facility. After undergoing an intense experiment it’s her wits and savvy that spring her, and fellow captive Glen Logan, from their captors. Using her family connections Maggie ends up bringing Glen along for the ride as they escape to the Caribbean Island of Fantomas. Neither of them is prepared for what lies ahead. The island has descended into chaos thanks to the joining of a money-hungry woman and one of the strongest spirits in Voodoo lore. This isn’t a tropical vacation that will leave you with a tan. You’ll be lucky to leave with your body intact.

Don’t let the eighty-four-chapter count intimidate you. Many of the chapters are short, carrying important information in succinct little pages. Burke knows how to engage his audience as his cast of strong female leads aren’t ready to lay down and accept their fate. Maggie, Sarafina and Lavonia are the three main characters of this tale and they couldn’t be more different from each other. On one hand you’ve got Maggie, who is an army chopper pilot who isn’t afraid of anything and not about to take sass. Sarafina is the lovely Voodoo priestess who has inherited her title at a young age, but don’t let her youth fool you. Lavonia is a greedy former beauty queen looking to make a fast buck and is ill-prepared to deal with the consequences of her desires. These three cross paths in the most interesting of ways on the small island of Fantomas. Burke weaves his tale and captivates his audience with ease.

Voodoo Child is the first book in a series and it does an excellent job of setting the stage for the story to come. The first volume can make or break a series and Burke seems to understand that as he lays out the world in which his characters live. The relevant characters have their back stories tenderly flushed out and the basics of Voodoo, which is an obvious major part of the tale, are carefully explained. Since Voodoo is a real religion Burke must have had to research and ensure that what he is portraying in his story is correct. The care in which he takes in explaining the various rituals reveal that he did indeed do more than spend five minutes Googling the subject.

If the chapter count hasn’t scared you off you’ll find yourself entangled in a mess of zombies, arrogant humans and spiteful spirits out to take what is theirs. The chaos has meaning and while there are horrific moments in the story none of them feel overdone or out of place. If horror stories are your thing, you’ll definitely find what you’re looking for within the pages of Voodoo Child.

Pages: 333 | ASIN: B01H9E4HDA

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