Julia’s memories

Julia's memories (Amor Mundi Book 1) by [Dröge, Dave]

A futuristic look at one woman’s life is what readers will find in Julia’s Memories by Dave Drӧge. The book is told from Julia’s point of view as she dictates her life to her PR robot. It’s an intense read that follows our protagonist as she navigates her life in this new world. However, her story takes place in 2050, which is not far off from where we are today. Readers in their twenties and thirties will find themselves identifying with Julia as she describes what is a not-so-distant future, but one we may not be comfortable with just yet.  While there are no flashy light saber battles in this unique science fiction story, this is a story of a woman’s experience with her life which transcends time.

The first thing to keep in mind about this book is that it is an English translation. That being said, it becomes easier to ignore the spelling or grammatical issues that crop up from time to time. They are not so great that they detract from the content of the story, but they are there nonetheless. There is a lot of content in this dense book. Not only is the word count dense, the content is dense. This book is a sort of existential look at a person’s life. With that comes philosophical thinking and a viewpoint that  is unique.

If philosophical thoughts and conversations about what makes up humanity are your thing, then this book is definitely something that you will enjoy. Drӧge certainly dives right into the existential theme that he has built this novel upon. Seeing this world through Julia’s memories gives readers the ability to distance themselves from it and see things in a different way. While there are things that have occurred quite differently from our current timeline, there is no doubt that reading a book that takes place in 2050 is daunting to those who will live to see it. Less than 50 years away yet with the technological advancement one comes to expect from future-exploration books.

While there are a few drawbacks to this book, I found it to be an interesting read, if you can get past the seemingly insurmountable walls of text that will greet you on every page. This book offers a fascinating exploration into the human condition, it picks it a part piece by piece and examines each one.

Readers will find an interesting life-story in Julia’s Memories by Dave Drӧge as the book explores the memoirs of the title character. While this book has been translated, it is linear and easy to follow. That doesn’t make it any less of an impressive declaration of the human condition in a not too distant futuristic world. This book is definitely the novel to pick up if you want to philosophically muse about what it means to be human.

Pages: 364 | ASIN: B07DWJQQ1M

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About Literary Titan

The Literary Titan is a book review website which consists of mostly fiction books, but we do enjoy non fiction works that we're excited about. All reviews are the reviewer’s honest opinion. We love books and read constantly (seriously, it’s an addiction). We're always open to book review requests and have aspirations of one day being sucked into the Twilight Zone episode with Burgess Meredith where all he wants to do is read, but can’t until the world ends; you know what I mean? www.LiteraryTitan.com

Posted on August 4, 2018, in Book Reviews, Three Stars and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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