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Lifeliners

Lifeliners by [Vucak, Stefan]Wow, the details in this book are simply superb! Literally from page one of the story you are drawn in by the excellent attention to detail.

The main character, Nash Bannon, is hopelessly interesting and charming from the very first chapter. We learn so much about his past, his family life, siblings, and upbringing that by chapter two you are utterly fascinated and rooting for him no matter what. His love interest, Cariana Foster, is equally enchanting and the dialogue between these characters is so raw that you can’t help but fall in love with them. There is a huge elephant in the room regarding their relationship, but I don’t want to give away any big spoilers so let’s just say that it keeps you on the edge of your seat.

The idea of the Lifeliners; human beings that have evolved into some other state of existence not yet fully understood, is absolutely engaging. The way the author writes about the political atmosphere of the world surrounding these super-humans is realistic and you can feel the pain of their humanity (or non-humanity?) and the fear elicited from them by the rest of society.

The politics in this book is one of my favorite aspects. Because of how realistically the author conveys these ideas you feel like you’ve been transported into Nash’s world. Even though the idea of co-existing with humans who have super-natural abilities is un-realistic and physically unrelatable, the dialogue and world view portrayed in the book is so natural and believable that you feel like you are really dealing with the emotions of the characters on every page. The relationship between Nash and the homeless child Aleya (a lifeliner) is touching and tragic at the same time. To think of a world that can cast aside children like garbage just because they have different abilities is really upsetting to think about.

I also enjoyed the scientific aspects of the story. Literally no detail is left out when it comes to the genetic anomalies of the Lifeliners and Cariana’s work as a geneticist is fascinating. While liberties were obviously taken (as this is a fictional story), this aspect of the book is also frighteningly realistic. I felt as if this evolution within the human species could actually happen and that these types of moral dilemmas might really someday face the human race.

Overall, I would recommend this book, it was a page turner from start to finish. There aren’t many books that I can see myself reading multiple times, but Lifeliners is definitely one of them.

Pages: 431 | ASIN: B07GN8QV83

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What if it Were Possible?

What if it Were Possible? by [Collins, C. Ray]Ray Collins’s book, What if it Were Possible?, is a space-age adventure set not too far in the future. Protagonist, Ray Holland, finds himself heading up a top-secret mission that he didn’t sign up for. He had spent his career working in public relations for NASA, and is a self-proclaimed “average guy.” He couldn’t have predicted that he would be leading a crew of ex-cons on a recognizance mission into the unknown. Ray and the crew set out on this dangerous mission knowing they won’t see earth for years, if ever again. Like any good adventure, there are I was figurative and literal bumps throughout the journey.

This is an entertaining space adventure story that appealed to the kid in me that is always hoping for a whirlwind adventure. The book flows well, but sometimes hit patches where it would drag. I wanted them to get to space so badly that the buildup was killing me. I liked the way the middle section was written with Ray’s logs giving insight into current scenarios and how much time had passed. I preferred the writing in the parts that dealt with space travel. Apart from a few typos the book is written very well. They were few and far between.

Collins did a great job of explaining how the ship flew with the cabin area moving independently of the ship to keep that area level. He explained the ship’s technology in an understandable way. He also explained the wormhole and other space elements in a way that made sense. I didn’t get too lost in the details and could get a pretty good grasp on what was happening and how.

I wasn’t a big fan of the “aliens” being so similar to the people of earth. I could have gotten past the physicality being the same, but there were an overwhelming number of similarities that I couldn’t wrap my head around. Being an 80s/90s kid, I loved the Star Trek and Star Wars throwback references. It was a nice way of keeping everything from getting too technical or heavy. It also showed Ray’s humanity and made his character one that will be identifiable to readers. The references also made it feel like the story wasn’t too far from our own reality or time.

There is a love story that develops in the begginging chapters that I would of liked to see developed further, but the story takes a sharp turn into an entertaining space adventure story and left that bit behind.

What if it Were Possible? was a good read that I recommend to readers of the Sci-Fi genre, especially anyone looking for a space adventure story that stays true to it’s roots. The journey through space was my favorite part and kept me engaged. Readers will root for Ray and his crew of misfits. I look forward to reading more of their adventures in the future.

Pages: 292 | ASIN: B077ZDCWBN

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A Fire in the West

A Fire in the West: Stonegate Book 3 by [Fox, Harry James, Midgway, Lucia]

A Fire in the West is a Christian fantasy novel that is the third installment in the Stonegate Series. The third book takes place a hundred years after the first two, in the west of the Rocky Mountains. Even though the book takes place in the future, it seems that civilization has taken a back step. The novel takes place in the United States, and even though some locations are easily recognizable to the reader, it’s evident that they have changed in many ways. The one thing that has completely changed are the characters within the novel. They are left without the technological advances needed or wanted to face life’s challenges. They’re faced with evil and have to work together to battle it while keeping their basic values intact.

One of the big things that I appreciated within this novel was the authenticity of the main characters. I found there to be a good mix of characters and all were believable. Harry James Fox and Lucia Mudgway do a great job at giving each character a level of complexity that makes them more interesting. The authors also do a good job at setting up the dystopian future that the characters are living in, so these aspects of the novel are believable to the reader as well. I can see how the break from the social norm and downfall of technology came about.

Even though this was the last book in trilogy, the reader can still follow along with the story line without having to read the first to books. It’s a good enough story to want to go back and read the first two however.

I thought that the theme of Christianity within the story was a bit off from what I was expecting. We understand from the beginning of the novel that Christianity has remained with the characters despite the collapse of just about everything else. This story line provides the argument that once everything else is gone, our faith in God remains. But the characters don’t discuss or display an intimate relationship with him throughout the novel. I felt that there was no specific relationship with God illustrated throughout the novel, and I thought that the characters also don’t seem to give a second thought to the devil or the idea of hell. He’s present within the novel, but I never got the feeling that the characters actually feared him, it was more of a loathing towards him. These missing pieces aren’t necessarily a bad thing, just something that I thought might have been incorporated into the tale.

This book can be read and enjoyed by adults and young adults. Fox and Mudgway work together to create an interesting story that keep the reader’s attention and harkens back to an important aspect of any society, culture, or religion – morality.

Pages: 343 | ASIN: B07DRRMZLF

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Between the Lines

Dave Droge Author Interview

Dave Droge Author Interview

Julia’s Memories is a fictional futuristic memoir that recounts the life of an artist and activist going into her 55th birthday. What were some themes you wanted to capture in this novel?

First I want to thank you for reading the novel, it’s not an easy read. But to answer this first question: I can’t really remember right now anymore what themes I was thinking of when starting with the writing of this novel. I guess I wanted to explore Julia’s live as the daughter of Henk, the protagonist of The Game Changer, and I wanted the atmosphere to be different then this book about the harbor of Rotterdam. I think I remember just now that I had something like the writing of Proust, Nadas and Faulkner in mind. In this sense though the novel is finished for me and the notes I wrote have been burned.

Julia is an artist and activist and it seems that shes has done many interesting things in her life. Did you put anything from your own life into this book?

No, not that I recall. But probably there is some of this influence in between the lines, although the main character is a woman. Probably it’s more present in Daan his letter after her asking how he sees events of the past.

What is the next book that you are working on and when will it be available?

Now that part 1 and 2 are being proof-edited by Cate Baum, I am working on Part 3 of the Amor Mundi series. I have no idea when it will be finished yet. Thanks for having this interview.

Author Links: GoodReadsFacebookWebsite

Julia's memories (Amor Mundi Book 1) by [Dröge, Dave]

Julia’s memories (part 1 of the Amor Mundi series) is a biography and coming of age novel, written from the future.

Julia, a passionate artist and activist, writes her memoires. She does so within the year 2050. This gives us an idea how the Transition has been shaped, how the social revolution is partly achieved through her artworks, after her father fled the Netherlands in 2014.

June 2050. Julia, a renowned artist, celebrates her 55th birthday. Encouraged by the mayor of Rotterdam she decides to write her memoirs. She wants unravel her past, to understand it better, and hopes that youth will be able to learn something from this candid quest in her hard-won life. Being the daughter of a born entrepreneur and businessman and partly raised by the high society family from her mothers site, being confronted with tragedy in her youth, she describes how she struggles to get a grip and slowly manages to form her own, powerful, identity. Fortunately, she gets help from her imaginary friends, from a local artist and from the Romenian secretary of her father. Meanwhile however, during her writing, fragments of another reality, fragments that increase in quantity and intensity, distract her and influence her memoirs.

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A Little Rebellious

Pamela Schloesser Canepa Author Interview

Pamela Schloesser Canepa Author Interview

Undercurrents in Time follows Tabitha as she sets off on her own adventures to try and understand what will happen to her family in the future. What were some themes that you felt were important and wanted to explore in this novel?

I felt the theme of balancing family and personal identity were very important, as this is something that happens to may women. Hence, the focus and tone does become a little different in Undercurrents in Time. There is also a theme of love/romance, as one’s expectations of love sometimes experience drastic changes as life goes on. However, there is still some fun in this book. Tabitha is a little rebellious as she tries to deal with her perceived loss of personal identity. She is a stubborn, strong-willed woman just as she was in Detours in Time.

Tabitha is an interesting character that I enjoyed exploring. What served as your inspiration while you were creating her character?

They say to write what you know. Well, I sure don’t always do that, however, I have spent a lifetime of holding in my opinions and second guessing the things I have said. Maybe that is what turned me into a writer. I revisit and reinvent my responses to scenarios from my life. I made Tabitha a strong-willed, outspoken woman, as that is what I have been taught not to be all my life, yet, I have always been stubborn. I think she deals with it in a healthier way. She is also never a peace maker just for the sake of being a peace maker. Her experiences in this book go back to some of my experiences with marriage and motherhood. I imagined some of the things I really longed to do when I was at that point in my life. However, I wanted to make her heroic. So, she was based on a mix of myself, the person I wish I was, and the personality of Jodie Foster’s character in Contact. (If I had to choose an existing character).

What were some ideas you wanted to carry over from Detours in Time and what were some new ideas you wanted to expand on in this book?

I wanted to revisit the character of Sal and expand a little bit on the character of Louise as well as giving some story to their family. In between, we have Calais. I also wanted Sal to have more backstory in this timeline while giving more backstory to Tabitha’s brother, Jared, whose life is drastically different in this timeline.

Ideas I carried over were the differences between Milt and Tabitha’s personalities, and how Milt really does not try to change her. Another was the suffering we do for our family members, learning to love them while stepping back a little and balancing our concern for them with concern for ourselves. Another thing I wanted to expand on the reality of love, how the illusion of new love is never the same as what you have a few years later. Yet, there is hope. I am trying not to give away key plot points here….

Are you a fan of the science fiction genre? What are some of your favorite time travel movies or books?

I certainly am a fan of the science fiction genre! When I was younger, I’d read my mom’s Stephen King books and just loved how they warped my understanding of reality. I loved Planet of the Apes, Back to the Future, Dr. Who, and many futuristic dystopian books and movies. I loved reading Kings 11-22-63 and the Outlander series, though I am hard-pressed to read her recent 1,000 pages tomes. I also loved The Time Traveler’s Wife, which was a mix of time travel and romance. To be honest, I haven’t read that many time travel books, it is more the time travel shows that have impressed on me, that and historical fiction or dystopian fiction. I love to ponder how things would be different if we tweaked just one little facet of our lives.

What is the next novel that you are working on and when will it be available?

Malachi (from Undercurrents) is speaking to me. It’s funny, I also started a story last fall about Norrie from the Made for Me series, but I think Malachi will be next. However, that could change. Can you tell I don’t write full-time? Sometimes I write to shave off remnants of a bad day, or I catch a mood. I get inspired at times by the oddest things. I am sure this is why the tone in my novels is not always the same. At any rate, I write a lot in Nov. and Dec. when there is less daylight, then I send to beta-readers, ruminate on it, revise, etc. Summer is usually when I like to publish a book because I teach, and summer allows me time to devote to releasing a book. However, I have short story ideas that I may release in the fall or spring. Following my newsletter is a great way to get notice of my stories or new releases, as I sometimes send free short stories to those on my newsletter list. I have ideas for other characters from Undercurrents in Time as well as new ideas that may not get the attention they need until I retire. Please don’t ask when that is. I have got to play the lottery more often…For sure, I will have plenty to keep me busy!

Author Links: GoodReadsFacebookTwitterWebsiteNewsletter

Undercurrents in Time: Book 2 of the Detours in Time series by [Schloesser Canepa, Pamela]Time travel took Tabitha and Milt to places they could never have imagined….

Now it seems the very things that cemented their bond will also drive a wedge between them emotionally. Travel to the future, discovery of a long-lost, troubled family member, and an unplanned baby all have taken a toll. Tabitha struggles to accept her new identity as a mother while remaining a strong, independent woman. She longs for a getaway, even a short one, but that getaway puts her on a collision course with danger. 

Milt is busy trying to prevent a horrible future disaster at the hands of an enemy he has not yet met. While concerned, Milt doesn’t even suspect Tabitha’s plans, the very plans that will have her facing Milt’s nemesis.

Tabitha risks it all on a brief escape. How will she handle the unforeseen dangers she faces and make her way back home? How far will Tabitha and Milt go to prevent tragedy?

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Who the Heroes and Villains Truly Are….

J.I. Rogers Author Interview

J.I. Rogers Author Interview

The Korpes File follows a technician born into the underclass of his world when he is marked by the ruling class as a threat due to his genetic make-up and is forced to fight back. What was the inspiration for the idea at the core of this exciting novel?

This is a complicated question to answer because the inspiration came in stages over the course of thirty years.

I was an artist long before I became an author. Concepts for the world of Tamyrh started showing up in illustrations while I was still in high school in the early-80s.

In 2012, a friend approached me to brainstorm on a game he was designing. I suggested that he let me do some world-building for him, and I wrote two pieces of flash fiction to go with the maps I’d designed. The game was shelved (unfortunately), and my work was returned to me, but that burst of writing led me to dig Tamyrh out of my portfolio case and look at it again. That was it; my objective became “write something that I would want to read,” and books one through five were plotted by the following summer.

Dystopian themes in science fiction are popular, and I wanted to create something that depicted both the protagonists and antagonists as living in the shadows and light between good and evil. To have a worthy, three-dimensional hero, you must have an equally worthy, three-dimensional adversary. Each one has to have reasons behind what they do, and regardless of how they start out they each have to have the potential to redeem or to condemn themselves. Thus, my series is about life, people, flawed, challenged, and hopefully tangible enough to touch. Ultimately, the reader’s sympathies will decide who the heroes and villains truly are….

Nash Korpes is an interesting character that, I felt, continued to develop as the story progressed. What were some themes you wanted to capture while writing his character?

First, thank you for the compliment. If I’m going to be honest, I didn’t start off with a theme for Nash apart from the fact that he was taken from his family in the Diaspora at an early age, and that he was isolated because of his ‘gifts’ and heritage. I wrote a few short scenes of interaction and dialogue and then let his personality emerge organically as the plot points presented themselves. I’m still learning things about him. At heart, he’s a good man, he tries his best, but like everyone, he falls down, gets dirty, and can make terrible decisions that have lasting ramifications. By the end of book one, I felt he was a non-angsty, relatable protagonist for everyone who’s ever felt like they were on the outside looking in due to their ethnicity, a disability, or their socio-economic background.

This book is a gritty thriller and action-packed adventure to the very end. What were some sources of inspiration for the detailed world in this book?

I’ve been fortunate enough to have traveled widely and lived abroad in my early years, and those experiences can’t help but factor into my world’s design unconsciously.

As I mentioned earlier, I consciously began world-building Tamyrh back in high school; I’m an artist, so creating maps, designing the aliens, and doing concept art was fun. The toxic jungle, “The Seep”, as well as the ancient history of Tamyrh were invented then, but, I didn’t officially begin adding in the hard-science behind my world until 2012. Since then, I’ve been compiling research to give my world a sense of dimension and reality.

Now, I have an entire Pinterest account dedicated to ‘novel inspirations’ – it includes flora, fauna, visuals for the racial groups, cluster city concepts, diaspora inspiration, articles on real-world developments in science and physics, and cutting-edge technological advancements. They do say that a picture is worth a thousand words.
On an associated note, I’m planning to release a limited edition character sketchbook in 2020 – Patreon funded. A bestiary and world atlas are also in the works.

This is book one in the 942 Series, when will book two be available and where will the story pick up in that book?

I’m finishing up book two right now, and I plan to release it in December. The story picks up with Nash and Davis, roughly two months after the end of book one. A collection of short stories from the series will be published in October.

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For those that love classic “Star Trek” and modern “Battlestar Galactica”, “The Korpes File” taps a fresh vein of science fiction gold.

“As if being born Diasporan wasn’t enough, Technician Nash Korpeshas the bad luck to match his Tyran ancestors in form and manner. Thesetraits, though highly prized by the special projects division at Korlune Military Research and Development, mark him as a specter from theirwarlike past. With only his intellect to save his sanity, he wages aprivate war against the entire socioeconomic status quo and uncovers anemesis that threatens them all.”

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Literary Titan Book Awards August 2018

The Literary Titan Book Awards are awarded to books that have astounded and amazed us with unique writing styles, vivid worlds, complex characters, and original ideas. These books deserve extraordinary praise and we are proud to acknowledge the hard work, dedication, and imagination of these talented authors.

Literary Titan Gold Book Award

Gold Award Winners

Finding AJ (Apocalypse Journeys Book 2) by [Melrose, Russ]Suffering Ends When Awakening Begins by [Crown, Robert]

Intrepid (Justin Thorn Book 2) by [Cressman, Ken]Promotion Protocol: Unlock the Secrets of Promotability & Career Success by [Nugent Ed.D., Kim]

The Warrior Teenager: Let Go of Self-Sabotage & Embrace Your True Power by [Fernandez, Mary Lynne]His Father's Blood (Legends of the Family Dyer Book 2) by [Thompson, David W.]A u 7 9: A Tracker Novel by [Dickason, Anita]

Portals in Time: The Quest for Un-Old-Age by [Teressi, John Joseph]The Cold Trail (The Sean Kruger Series Book 4) by [Fields, J.C.]

8 Ways to Happiness: From Wherever You Are by [Pei, Dr. Marissa]Burnt Face: Scarred for Life by [Swann, Annette]

Literary Titan Silver Book Award

Silver Award Winners

Till it Stops Beating by [Goodman, Hannah R.]Pharaoh's Arrow by [Neeb, George]

The Masked Queen's Lament (The Gift-Knight Trilogy Book 3) by [Madeley, Dylan]the LOST PHOTOGRAPHS by [Carroll, Richard Ira]Burned in Stone by [Carroll, Richard Ira]

When Darkness Follows (Beyond the Grave series #4) by [Daniels, Athena]The King's Horse - Book 1: A Mondus Fumus Series by [Dreece, Adam]Undercurrents in Time: Book 2 of the Detours in Time series by [Schloesser Canepa, Pamela]

Penchant Revealed by [Elizaga, J.]

I am Still a Rose: In Spite of it All by [Barbee, Tonya]Pretty Dolls and Hand Grenades by [Reinard, Cara]Kill the Teachers: Mexico's Bloody Repression of Human Rights by [Stout, Robert Joe]

 

Visit the Literary Titan Book Awards page to see award information and see all award winners.

 

 

Julia’s memories

Julia's memories (Amor Mundi Book 1) by [Dröge, Dave]

A futuristic look at one woman’s life is what readers will find in Julia’s Memories by Dave Drӧge. The book is told from Julia’s point of view as she dictates her life to her PR robot. It’s an intense read that follows our protagonist as she navigates her life in this new world. However, her story takes place in 2050, which is not far off from where we are today. Readers in their twenties and thirties will find themselves identifying with Julia as she describes what is a not-so-distant future, but one we may not be comfortable with just yet.  While there are no flashy light saber battles in this unique science fiction story, this is a story of a woman’s experience with her life which transcends time.

The first thing to keep in mind about this book is that it is an English translation. That being said, it becomes easier to ignore the spelling or grammatical issues that crop up from time to time. They are not so great that they detract from the content of the story, but they are there nonetheless. There is a lot of content in this dense book. Not only is the word count dense, the content is dense. This book is a sort of existential look at a person’s life. With that comes philosophical thinking and a viewpoint that  is unique.

If philosophical thoughts and conversations about what makes up humanity are your thing, then this book is definitely something that you will enjoy. Drӧge certainly dives right into the existential theme that he has built this novel upon. Seeing this world through Julia’s memories gives readers the ability to distance themselves from it and see things in a different way. While there are things that have occurred quite differently from our current timeline, there is no doubt that reading a book that takes place in 2050 is daunting to those who will live to see it. Less than 50 years away yet with the technological advancement one comes to expect from future-exploration books.

While there are a few drawbacks to this book, I found it to be an interesting read, if you can get past the seemingly insurmountable walls of text that will greet you on every page. This book offers a fascinating exploration into the human condition, it picks it a part piece by piece and examines each one.

Readers will find an interesting life-story in Julia’s Memories by Dave Drӧge as the book explores the memoirs of the title character. While this book has been translated, it is linear and easy to follow. That doesn’t make it any less of an impressive declaration of the human condition in a not too distant futuristic world. This book is definitely the novel to pick up if you want to philosophically muse about what it means to be human.

Pages: 364 | ASIN: B07DWJQQ1M

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Portals in Time: The Quest for Un-Old-Age

Portals in Time: The Quest for Un-Old-Age by [Teressi, John Joseph]

In the book Portals of Time, The Quest for Un-Old-Age, a team of ten Gripps were put together from the prison system to travel to other times, universes, or even dimensions to find the answer to the question, “how do we get more time”? The problem with their society was that people were aging before their time and, diseases of the elderly were showing up in the youth. Many teams were sent out to find information to Un-Old-Age some came back and some didn’t, the teams that came back with helpful information were pardoned from prison. Each team member had a talent or unique knowledge that was essential to the success of the mission.

This team, the Eye of Time Exploration Team, landed on Acronos. Upon first landing they have to travel across a sea and are attacked by sea monsters feeding off of their fear and when they reach the main land they encounter the guardians of this mystical land in the form of two dogs that will ultimately be their guides through this strange world. The team goes through a series of events known as: Hedges of Hedora, the river of time, the forest, time warps, and time vortexes, as well as meeting teachers, Bo and Ben, Fabius and Filloloper, along the way that give them the answers to Un-Old-Age in riddles but ultimately the team has to figure out what the messages are. It is never outright told to them. Each Gripp takes a different amount of time to learn the lesson but there are always a couple that never get it.

The book was hard to put down, I would spend hours at a time reading it. It covers so much indirectly and directly at the same time when it comes to society, spirituality, and the mentality of a society as well as our society. The weaving of all of the previously mentioned, with quantum physics, was so well done that I never lost track of the story line and it was so easy to make the connections in the book to our real world. I liked that it made me think about my own existence and belief system. I really like the Harmony poems describing the harmonies and the quotes that were highlighted throughout the book and then the way they were broken down by chapter at the end of the book.

I would advise to look for extra un-needed words in some places and a needed word or two in other places. The only other thing that I would have done would be put the description of the different Gripps at the beginning of the book instead of at the end of the book. Other than that, this is a beautifully written book, one that I think many people would enjoy for it’s unique vision of the world and it’s subtle yet profound commentary on society.

Pages: 412 | ASIN: B0797PTD46

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The Korpes File

Few debut books attempt to achieve what J. I. Rogers set out to achieve, and even fewer are able to create a story that is so unlike everything else out there. The Korpes File is one such work and a stellar debut novel for Rogers. Nash Korpes, a technician, born a Diasporan, the underclass of his world. When he is marked by the ruling class as a threat due to his genetic make-up, it is up to his own intelligence to fight back against not only the ones who hunt him, but the entire ruling class that looks down on everything from their comfortable high-rises.

The goal of Nash and fighting what is essentially the 1% in Korpes’ world is both thrilling and interesting. And danger is never far from the characters in the form of corporate assassins, mass killings, and political intrigue. It is truly a dangerous, but wondrous world to inhabit all at the same time. The city states hide underground from the caustic rains on the surface, while the elites work on new ways to maintain control by subverting the masses under them.

Both a gritty thriller and action-packed adventure, The Korpes File is a fast-paced race to the end, as Nash attempts to survive in this dystopian world. Yet, all of our investment isn’t solely spent on Nash, but on the plethora of other characters who fill these pages. The multiple points-of-view is surprising, especially in a first novel, but Rogers is able to pull this off by making sure all of his characters are dynamic, and at their core real “people.” This was probably one of the best parts of this book, and feeling all of their motivations and emotions was a particular pleasure, especially in a genre when the focus can rely too much on background technology or plot. Some of the pacing at times became a little strange with Rogers’ choice to skip over years in places, but it seemed to be a wash by the end.

It isn’t often that a dystopian thriller can rise on a new set of legs, but Rogers sure does that here and makes sure that the start of his new series starts off running. This book will be a pleasure to readers of all genres, as long as they can tolerate a gritty undertone and sometimes brutal violence. If they can trust Nash, then they will be in good hands.

Pages: 342 | ASIN: B06XCZNTK7

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