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Julia’s memories

Julia's memories (Amor Mundi Book 1) by [Dröge, Dave]

A futuristic look at one woman’s life is what readers will find in Julia’s Memories by Dave Drӧge. The book is told from Julia’s point of view as she dictates her life to her PR robot. It’s an intense read that follows our protagonist as she navigates her life in this new world. However, her story takes place in 2050, which is not far off from where we are today. Readers in their twenties and thirties will find themselves identifying with Julia as she describes what is a not-so-distant future, but one we may not be comfortable with just yet.  While there are no flashy light saber battles in this unique science fiction story, this is a story of a woman’s experience with her life which transcends time.

The first thing to keep in mind about this book is that it is an English translation. That being said, it becomes easier to ignore the spelling or grammatical issues that crop up from time to time. They are not so great that they detract from the content of the story, but they are there nonetheless. There is a lot of content in this dense book. Not only is the word count dense, the content is dense. This book is a sort of existential look at a person’s life. With that comes philosophical thinking and a viewpoint that  is unique.

If philosophical thoughts and conversations about what makes up humanity are your thing, then this book is definitely something that you will enjoy. Drӧge certainly dives right into the existential theme that he has built this novel upon. Seeing this world through Julia’s memories gives readers the ability to distance themselves from it and see things in a different way. While there are things that have occurred quite differently from our current timeline, there is no doubt that reading a book that takes place in 2050 is daunting to those who will live to see it. Less than 50 years away yet with the technological advancement one comes to expect from future-exploration books.

While there are a few drawbacks to this book, I found it to be an interesting read, if you can get past the seemingly insurmountable walls of text that will greet you on every page. This book offers a fascinating exploration into the human condition, it picks it a part piece by piece and examines each one.

Readers will find an interesting life-story in Julia’s Memories by Dave Drӧge as the book explores the memoirs of the title character. While this book has been translated, it is linear and easy to follow. That doesn’t make it any less of an impressive declaration of the human condition in a not too distant futuristic world. This book is definitely the novel to pick up if you want to philosophically muse about what it means to be human.

Pages: 364 | ASIN: B07DWJQQ1M

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Interflow of Things

Interflow of Things by [Dröge, Dave]

The year is 2050 and the overreaching A.I. is about to achieve total domination of the planet. If it succeeds, the end of humanity is certain. No resistance is expected since the human race has been herded into obedience and a false sense of security using high tech illusions and complacency. But the resistance is brewing – the Free Hackers are moving in the shadows, avoiding the scanners, blending with the crowd. They will cross the world, from Rotterdam to Sicily and all the way to California, in hopes of stopping the inevitable.

Interflow of Things by David Droge is a highly realistic vision of the future brought about by the constant revolutions in computing we have been witnessing in the past few decades. His A.I. starts its journey in our time but quickly spreads to control the world from the shadows. Its insatiable hunger for processing power has it manipulating governments and even change entire stratas of society. It uses high tech gadgetry to mask its debilitating effect on the planet. I enjoyed the superbly technical implementation of the technology which was always believable, especially when we remember how human totalitarian regimes have been able to accomplish the same effect without it.

Human emotions are the bedrock of its power – living in the A.I. controlled reality is comfortable. So much so that unplugging from it requires drug treatments and therapy. Julia, the first character we meet, needed extensive therapy provided by the Free Hackers before she got her emotions and clarity of mind back. And she was one of the lucky ones. Augmented reality dream is a prison of your own mind and you carry it everywhere. Why wouldn’t you? It makes everything, vision, smell, feel and touch, more beautiful! Droge is able to touch and develop every detail of the story so that you are completely immersed by the time you are just a few chapters in.

But the human emotion is something the A.I. doesn’t understand. Throughout the book we get inklings into the operation of this vast mind. Millions of calculations are being done in hopes of understanding basic human concepts and abilities, all in vain.

These passages serve the purpose of giving us the idea of the incomprehensible A.I.’s motivations. They turn out to be one of the few passages of the book that make sense. Dave Droge has translated this novel into English and the results could have been better. A layered and interesting world of the future was hard for me to comprehend. His human characters are intriguing but their motivation was obscured by poor translation.

Interflow of Things – the name of the novel is an obvious, ominous allusion to the current “Internet of Things” trend in computing integrated with ordinary business of living. It shows the future that we might be heading in. Droge gives us a warning that we might become willing slaves of computer controlled social constructs that we don’t really understand or care to understand. If the object of our desires is a real person or an android, will we know? Will we even care at that point? This is a fantastic science fiction story that can only get better.

Pages: 196 | ASIN: B07BTT6KRK

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