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A Dark Mirror And A Passageway

Andi Hayes Author Interview

Andi Hayes Author Interview

The Rebellious Earthling follows Ermina and her experiences in the depraved goblin world. What was the inspiration for the setup to this exciting novel?

The hellish world of Tartarus served as both a dark mirror and a passageway to the evil that is business-as-usual behind certain closed doors on Earth. The intent was to expose normalized cruelties and aberrant, sociopathic behaviors in what’s considered a civilized society. Inspiration for the landscape came from many sources, including artwork like Hieronymus Bosch paintings and “The Harrowing of Hell,” and books like “The Princess and The Goblin” and Orwell’s “1984.” The Turquoise Mirror did actually exist at one time but has since been gotten rid of for its unflattering reflection and creepy aura.

Lord Phegor infects a village of noble goblins to create a new species of demonic creatures. What were some themes you wanted to capture in their race?

The new species created was one void of all empathy, decency and morals; they had willingly given up their souls in exchange for hedonistic lives free of guilt or remorse. Theirs was a joyless existence, as every emotion not rooted in hate, pride or deceit was deemed useless and burdensome. Their apathy, narcissism and division amongst themselves served a purpose: it gave the Cabal even more power to control every aspect of their lives, all while allowing them to think they were free.

I appreciated the depth of Ermina and Fairuzo characters and I found their relationship well developed. What were some driving ideals behind their characters and relationship?

The Fairuzo character was based on the magnetic personality traits of an alluring, charismatic sociopath. Ermina’s naïve optimism and adventurous spirit enabled her to see past his cruel exterior enough to recognize a tiny speckle of good within him. In return, he saw within her an innocence long absent from his depraved world of debauchery, a purity he yearned to both corrupt yet preserve. A textbook case of opposites attracting; together, they were the meeting and melding of good and evil. And it is said that good always triumphs over evil.

What is the next novel that you are working on and when will it be available?

My next novel is a pet memoir entitled “Bratskulla The Magical Cat.” It will be available sometime in 2019.

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The Rebellious Earthling: Tale of The Turquoise Mirror by [Hayes, Andi]

ALICE IN WONDERLAND meets DANTE’S INFERNO
She loves animals… he loves to sacrifice them. It’s a mismatch made in HELL.

An entirely new species of demonic creatures is spawned when Lord Phegor of the Fallen Angels infects a village of kind and noble goblins. Their mutated offspring now populate the God-forsaken planet of Tartarus where souls are taboo and nothing is sacred. It is into this hellish realm that the prim but virtuous Ermina descends after having impulsively accompanied Phegor’s charismatic son, Lord Fairuzo, back to his kingdom deep underground.

Surrounded by vicious, hedonistic trolls whose sordid pleasures include sacrificing animals, tormenting slaves and indulging in violent orgies, the animal-loving Ermina refuses to participate in any of the cruel depravity. Suspected of possessing an intact soul and under constant surveillance by a diabolical Cabal, she must now find a way to escape back to Earth or be eaten alive.

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His Methods of Madness

Author Interview Dave Matthes

Author Interview Dave Matthes

Bar Nights is a chronicle of the life of Arlo Smith who walks away from his life after finding his wife in bed with another man. Arlo’s finds his life in a troublesome spot in the beginning of the novel. What was your inspiration for his family situation and how he removes himself from it?

The inspiration never really came from anything first hand. One day I just started writing the book because I had nothing else to do, and I had already scrapped several ideas for other books, some of which became short stories. I think mostly though, that feeling of desperation that comes with having had enough of a certain situation that’s been going on for far too long, was something I’ve been through before. How Arlo feels, that sense of apathy, but also pleasure, with starting over, was my biggest takeaway from my own personal life that applied to the birth of the character “Arlo Smith”.

The plot to Bar Nights seems simple, a man tries to bury his pain with alcohol, but there’s complexity in Arlo’s pain and the people he meets. What was your writing strategy in terms of plot design when writing this story?

Thoughts and thought processes. A lot of the time we don’t actually think about the process of “thinking”, and sometimes the point in which we change direction in our thoughts is lost completely. The way I employed the use of “chapters” in Bar Nights and the rest of The Mire Man Trilogy reflects that. The plot design really had no design, at least while writing Bar Nights. I just started writing it one day and kept going with it. There wasn’t really a story, in a literal sense, I was aiming for. Bar Nights was originally intended to be just a short book about a guy living in a bar and all of the people he met there, nothing more.

Arlo is locked in a vicious cycle of self-hate, addiction, and depression that is reflected in the people he meets. Did we get to meet everyone you planned to write or did you take out any characters?

I did take out a few, but at the time that they would have existed in the story of Bar Nights, they were very minuscule. Once I decided to make Bar Nights the first book in a trilogy, I placed those characters in the following books in the trilogy as supporting characters that would hopefully help Arlo more on his journey.

I feel like Bar Nights is an examination of addiction and desperation. How do you feel Arlo deals with these things that’s different from other people?

Different? I think that his methods of madness are only different because at first, he really doesn’t have much to lose. Once he finds his way to the bar “Purgatory”, that’s it for him. He really doesn’t have anyone who cares enough to tell him to stop. And if he never met Constance, for all we know, he would have died there. So in a sense, all he really uses to deal with his addictions, is apathy. Complete, pure, remorseless apathy. He knows he has problems, and he reflects upon them constantly, but he really doesn’t care enough to examine them on a level that may or may not lead to his redemption. Not yet anyway.

Bar Nights is the first book in the Mire Man Trilogy with Madlands being the third book. How do you feel Arlo has developed over the series?

Well, in Bar Nights, even though it’s the first book, we sort of meet Arlo at his middle. In the second book, Paradise City, we’re taken back to “where it all began”, so he’s still a child in those days, and definitely hasn’t reached that purified level of “sheer apathetic asshole”. By the third book, Return to the Madlands, Arlo is pushed passed his “breaking point” in the first book, and beyond to a point in which he is literally faced with the choice of “live your life like this and die like this” or “live your life like THIS, but still… die like this”. The difference being in the choice of the latter, he’d be taking a chance, forsaking what he “set out for” from the very beginning altogether. His story arc definitely reaches a point he never expected (and I never expected while writing it).

Bar Nights (The Mire Man Trilogy, #1)“Bar Nights”, the first volume of the “The Mire Man Trilogy”, is a story revolving around Arlo, a man who’s just turned 39. Fed up with the way his life has turned out thus far, he leaves his cheating wife, out of control preteen slut daughter and her “fiance”, his unbearably demeaning job, and hits the highway.

It isn’t long before his car dies on him, and he’s forced to take shelter in the only place available at the time: the for-rent room above a dive bar, named “Purgatory”, positioned seemingly in the middle of nowhere.

Convincing the owner to let him work off his rent, he spends his days drinking and care-taking the bar, running odd jobs for his boss, and spends his nights tucked away in his room drunkenly passing out to the sounds of whoever is playing the music downstairs…until one night he ventures out into the storm eternally encapsulating his world. And their paths unexpectedly converge.

The meeting sets in motion a relentless and remorseless onslaught of emotions, bringing Arlo to the absolute breaking point of insanity and introducing him to a realization that redefines why he ended up at “Purgatory” to begin with.

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