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Being a “Fairytale”

Ruth Finnegan
Ruth Finnegan Author Interview

Voyage of Pearl of the Seas follows two children who go on a whirlwind adventure where the boy must make an incredible sacrifice. Did the idea for the prequel to Black Inked Pearl come while you were writing that book or sometime afterwards?

Afterwards, in a dream. The idea of it being a “fairytale” comes from away back in my childhood, but also reminded, recently, by The Alchemist, a wonderful book.

I felt like the children were a symbol for something greater. Did you intend the story to portray them this way?

Yes ( though I hadn’t realised it when I was writing the book). Kate on the face of it is timid and exploring but with deep spiritual female strength which sustains them both, Christy male and on the face of it arrogant but a great skipper who is rightly humble before the waves and his beloved ship, recognises his dependence in Kate without whom he knows he wound never have voyaged at all and (her I disagree p with one reviewer’s assessment) makes the sacrifice of his young (growing-up and facing-things) life in turning back for the sake of Holly and Kate.

So the story in a way symbolises the female spiritual side of our nature and “the power of the weak” complementing male strength and expert mastery. We need both.

But forget all that – I’d say that basically it’s just a good yarn in its own right.

What were some themes that were important for you to explore in this book?

Mainly that God/Allah/Oluwa/whoever exists and is known worldwide by many names.

That fairy tales can hold deep truth.

What has been the most surprising reader reaction to your novel so far?

Not identifying insightfully with Christy ( and the Christy- dimension if OURSELVES) and so not realising the deep, well concealed, and enduring pain of his having to give up his lifelong and do-able plan to sail round the world.

Author Links: Website | Twitter | Facebook | GoodReads

An award-winning unput-downable tale of two children building a boat from a log they find buried in the sand and sailing off to far-off fantastic lands in a stormy sea-driven adventure with their faithful – but accident-prone – dog Holly. There they learn much wisdom from a king who, like God, has many names’. After an incredible sacrifice of his dearest dream by the boy (now growing up) they return – another dream – to a family tea with their loved ones. The tale is a prequel and companion to Ruth Finnegan’s award-winning epic romance ‘Black inked pearl’, here adapted for preteens but characterised by (in a simpler form) the same unique dream-like and enchanted style as in the original novel. 

The Lady and the Dragon

The lady and the dragon (Ruthfinn romance Book 1) by [Ruth Finnegan ]

The Lady and the Dragon by Ruth Finnegan is an intriguing fantasy story following a young lady, a powerful dragon, an angel, and a couple of philosophical conundrums. It’s all packaged in a delightfully poetic format and explores themes such as sin, humanity, and destruction in an easy and engaging manner.

This story seems like it was made to read aloud, with funny voices and panache. I couldn’t help myself from muttering the best bits to myself, even getting strange looks from the other occupants of my home. There’s alliterations and rhymes and repetition and onomatopoeia– basically a linguistic candy store. The book reads like classic literature, it is offbeat and charming without ever being boring. It creates a comforting atmosphere with plenty of depth and imagination.

It is hard not to smile when you reach the end– it was definitely a glimmer of hope and joy in my generally mundane days. I can easily see myself reading this book to my baby nephew or recommending it to my teenage sister. A witty story and sharp writing elevates this fantasy novel, and I personally thought it was refreshing and a good break from the intensity of the real world. The Lady and the Dragon captures the essentials of the soul, offers subtle commentary on humanity, and is written with precision and a depth of understanding that will fascinate any reader. I can’t wait for Ruthfinn Romance Book 2!

Pages: 46 | ASIN: B08XW8561P

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The Magic Sensation

Grendolyn Peach Soleil
Grendolyn Peach Soleil Author Interview

The Mermaids Melt at Dawn spins several yarns into a mythical story that combines many different genres. What was the initial idea behind this book and how did it change as you wrote?

When I started writing The Mermaids Melt at Dawn, I was inspired to begin the story like an old fairy tale. I also wanted the story to be somewhat tethered to reality, especially in the beginning, so I combined my passion for vintage fairy tales and historical fiction. Rok, a Cajun boy growing up on the bayou in the 1800s, was the first character to enter my imagination, and from there, the story transformed into a nautical adventure to Barbiche Island. I have always been fascinated by mermaids and Greek Mythology, so I decided to add a flair of mythology as well.

I am drawn to stories where humans, gods, and creatures coexist. I think there is something incredible about Rok, a real human, witnessing the mermaids of Barbiche Island. Rok lifted the veil between reality and fantasy and tasted the magic that humans so often dream about. As I wrote The Mermaids Melt at Dawn, I tried to capture the magic sensation we feel when we see the first snowflakes of winter or when we catch the first wave in the ocean.

Yarn 8 is my favorite from the book. Do you have a favorite yarn?

As I created different yarns and characters, I was curious to see which ones readers would enjoy the most. Based on the feedback I’ve received so far, Yarn 8/The Curse of Rhodanthea is a fan favorite and the most treasured yarn. Yarn 8 happens to be my favorite yarn as well. Of all the characters, I think Rhodanthea embodies a beautiful brokenness and a humble strength. For me, she is the perfect blend of human, god, and creature features. My second favorite yarns are Yarn 7/The Maiden and The Lyre and Yarn 9/The Rot Spine Monster. I had so much fun writing them, and they brought back fond memories of reading Greek Mythology as a child.

Each yarn seemed to focus on a different theme or had its own feeling. What were some emotions or feelings you wanted to capture in your stories?

Each yarn captures different emotions, moods, and personalities. Much like vintage fairy tales, each character can represent the light and dark aspects of ourselves. The Mermaids Melt at Dawn illuminates common archetypal patterns that are shared by all humans. Some of the experiences I tapped into are anger, sadness, fear, loneliness, love, humility, jealousy, joy, revenge, and remorse. I also crafted the story with some moments of surprise and horror as an homage to fairy tales and mythology, which were not rainbow and butterfly stories. They often had grim and shocking endings. Who could forget when Little Red Riding Hood found the granny wolf in bed, or when the old witch planned to stuff Hansel in the oven?

What is the next book that you are working on and when will it be available?

With Halloween just around the corner, it’s the perfect time of year to write a paranormal romance! My next book is in the early stages of the creative process, but characters and scenes are coming to life more and more every day. I hope to release my newest book within the next 6 months, and maybe it will be in time for Valentine’s Day!

Author Links: GoodReads | Twitter | Facebook | Website

Appearances can be deceiving…The Mermaids Melt at Dawn is a dark fairy tale from the bayou with a merfolk twist, but it is not a fairy tale for children. Meet Rok, a rowdy Cajun, who hunts monsters in the swampland. From the cradle, Rok remembers hearing the legend of Barbiche Island where mermaids surf the seas and grant the wishes of a few lucky men. While it may appear to be an innocent story about childhood dreams, the swamp hags and sea witches of old remind us that appearances can be deceiving.Each yarn dives deeper into the supernatural where mysteries abound and strange things happen. Rok’s obsession with Barbiche Island steers him on a nautical adventure where he battles the most powerful mermaid, but Rok is not the only creature with a story to tell. Barbiche Island is home to a pair of warring mermaid sisters, power-hungry Poseidon, petulant gods, and other mysterious monsters. The mermaids of Barbiche Island sing of love, survival, and betrayal, but will they answer the burning question? Why do the mermaids melt at dawn?

Caught (Sea Temptress Series Book 1)

Caught (Sea Temptress Series Book 1) by [Kimberley Cale]

Caught (Sea Temptress Series Book One) by Kimberley Cale is a fantasy romance story about a pirate captain seeking revenge against the mermaid he captures. Quinn O’Connor believes that Lorelei is responsible for sinking his ship The Mayhem and killing his crew, and he intends to make her pay. He refuses to listen when Lorelei tries to explain what happened. Though she is desperate to escape an arranged marriage to the sadistic brother of sirens, Lorelei’s sister will be forced to take her place if she does not return home. When Lorelei and Quinn end up stranded together on a deserted island, will she be able to find a way to save herself and her sister?

The author has an enjoyable and engaging writing style and the story kept my interest. Lorelei and Quinn start out as enemies, but feelings between them quickly grow. I liked Lorelei’s character throughout the entire story, and I enjoyed reading the interactions between her and her sisters, Jewel and Storm. The twist at the end of the book, that allowed Quinn and Lorelei to be together, was not what I was expecting, and I liked that this part was not predictable despite some familiar beings from myths and fantasy. I liked the inclusion of the mythological elements that were woven into the story. There were many humorous parts of this book, which caused me to laugh out loud more than once, and I enjoyed the quotes at the beginning of each chapter.

I didn’t like that the book started in one place in the story and then went backward to show the reader the “beginning” of the story. I prefer when books start at the beginning of the story, and in this case, it felt as though the out of order timeline hindered the forward momentum of the story.
There were some troubling aspects of the interactions between Quinn and Lorelei at the beginning when he used his superior strength against her to try to push for physical intimacy while he was holding her captive. Despite his justifications and the agreement they come to, it brings up questions about whether Lorelei is actually “willing” or not. Quinn redeems himself later in the book, and I was glad that the story ended happily for both Lorelei and Quinn.

I’m looking forward to the next story in the series about one of Lorelei’s sisters. Caught is an exciting adventure novel that will delight fantasy fans who would like to see a new layer added to the mermaid mythology.

Pages: 155 | ASIN: B08D7T8YSK

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