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Damaged And No Longer Under Warranty – Book Trailer

The battle to preserve eternity continues …

For Paul Tomenko, relocating trillions upon trillions of life forms on Earth to the Paraverse wasn’t all that difficult. So easy, in fact, he does it in his sleep. After slipping into a coma, Paul uses his latent divine knowledge to create the Paraverse while imagining 50 more years of continued life on Earth. Then he dumps—no pun intended—an incalculable number of souls residing in his lower intestinal tract into the new domain with the simplicity of a bowel movement.

But preserving the promise of eternal existence comes with a cost. Forced to abandon Maggie Mae Monahan, one of his two lovers, and two neo-Neanderthal children (Gronk and Grita) in what becomes known as the Originverse, Paul travels to Neoterica to begin anew with Allie Briarsworth, his other lover.

As default caretaker of the new expanse, Paul discovers he has committed a string of blunders that endanger forevermore. He can’t remember how he structured the Paraverse, and the schematics are deep inside him, retrievable piece by piece only when he makes eye contact with Allie. Unable to summon a heavenly version of Home Advisor to repair his expanse, Paul reassembles the Bioprovidence research team to make the needed modifications. But the crew lacks three of its essential members who are still in the Originverse. Challenged to create duplicates of the trio, he reluctantly does so, worried that a replica of Maggie Mae will re-create the love triangle that tormented him on Earth. And if all that wasn’t enough, the Cassamarians, fire-breathing alien insectoids determined to destroy humanity’s standing as the chosen species, have breached the barrier separating the Originverse and Paraverse.

In this sequel to Damaged Beyond All Recognition, Paul discovers how the cosmos began and who created the first universe. In doing so, he realizes he might have the power to do what untold gods before him did not: eliminate the number one scourge for all life forms.

Most of the supporting cast from the first Infinity’s Trinity novel returns in this book: Cher the Gatekeeper and Katharine Ross the Librarian, figments patterned after two celebrities for whom Paul has lusted; Gronk and Grita, two “resurrected” six-year-old neo-Neanderthals who are the most intelligent humans on Earth; Tsutomu Yamaguchi, an innovative bioengineer named after a Japanese man who survived nuclear bomb blasts in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and Dr. Peter Lexington Townshend, the former head of Bioprovidence now forced to assume a job he detests. In addition, some new characters join the ensemble: Dzhambo the Ukrainian Vodka-Drinking Circus Bear, Paul’s self-appointed bodyguard; a sassy Tina Turner-lookalike who patrols the most significant storage unit among the stars; and Rovert, an asylum-seeking Cassamarian who is desperately in need of dietary change.

Buckle up for an existential trip oiled with humor that glides across all that has been on the way to all that we hope will be.

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Societal Annoyances

Tom James
Tom James Author Interview

Your Children Are Boring provides a humorous and cutting examination of modern parenting. Why was this an important book for you to write?

I think like many of us, child-free or not, we’ve noticed some in society leaning towards a position where not only are children treated like little gods, and their parents the high priests, and those who choose not as selfish and sad (particularly women). I simply felt it was time to try and point this out, and perhaps address a few other articles of faith that needed an alternative view. Now I’ve stretched that religious analogy beyond breaking point, I also wanted to make people laugh, have a bit of a rant, and to explore the subject myself. Which is why it ranged from the small societal annoyances to surrogacy.

What is one piece of advice you would give to new parents?

Firstly, I’d say, there must be someone better to give you advice than me. Then if not, I’d suggest they ask yourself why you want children? I like to think most people’s reasons are relatively decent, and not self-centred. Maybe hope is more accurate. And dig deep to think what sort of parent you think you’d be and why. I think people believe there’s this mythical switch that gets flicked and you just become one, but the best parents I know, were thoroughly wonderful people in the first place.

What were some ideas that were important for you to explore in this book?

I think how having a child has seamlessly been woven into social media currency and our current penchant for identity politics. That’s something I felt was not only interesting, but important. Children being used almost as a prop, or parenthood as a badge of honour. I also find the subject of surrogacy interesting as it seems to me to be a massive blind spot morally for some. And then I wanted to expand on that wonderful George Carlin bit about children being special, with the thrust being, you all say they’re special, well they can’t be, otherwise the word loses all meaning…

What is one thing you hope readers take away from your book?

Honestly, I don’t expect anyone to agree with it all, so I hope it makes them laugh from time to time.

Author Links: GoodReads | Twitter | Facebook | Website

Are you sick of a society that seems obsessed with children? Do you find modern parents insufferable?

Your Children Are Boring is a uniquely humorous look at our culture’s obsession with children, a world where virtually every advert has a squawking child in it, where pubs are full of wailing infants, and where every other Facebook post is tagged #ProudDad.

Why do parents themselves behave like infants? Why having a child doesn’t make you less selfish, why it’s extremely unlikely that your child is in fact, ‘special’, and why modern parenting is ruining everything, not least the kids themselves.

All the answers lie within, and it’s your duty to read it.

Yes, Your Children Are Boring will make you laugh, but it’s much more than that. Once consumed you must take its teachings into the world and fix society. Or something. Oh and if you put ‘Dad’ or ‘Mum’ in your social media bios, this book is aimed at you.

Your Children Are Boring: or How Modern Parents Ruin Everything

Your Children Are Boring: or How Modern Parents Ruin Everything by [Tom James]

“You turned your house over to what is essentially a mentally ill dwarf with destructively nihilistic tendencies and no artistic merit.” Your Children Are Boring: or How Modern Parents Ruin Everything is filled with meme-able gems such as this quote. This humorous book is filled with incisive and funny observations on parents, children and humanity in general. Tom James provides an unabashed view of parenting in contemporary society. The tone and humor is reminiscent of the late great author Douglas Adams with his witty views of humanity or the comedian George Carlin, which is funny because I had this thought before seeing a quote from George Carlin in the book.

Each chapter begins with a quote about parenting or children from famous or revered people. This sets the tone for the short chapters and prepares readers for what they are about to dive into. There were many lines that made me literally laugh out loud. A good majority of the book felt perceptive and jocular, while a few times the text felt didactic, but all together felt fun. I’m a parent and can relate to a lot of the observations made and agree with the overall point of the book. Author Tom James makes this point in several clever and well researched ways. One of my favorites was the list of people with parents, at the top of the list was Saddam Hussein, contrasted with the list of people without parents, topping the list with Jane Austen and Francis Bacon.

If you have a good sense of humor, or at least you are not offended by the idea that your child may not be special, then you will certainly enjoy the humor found throughout this sharp examination of kids and parenting. Your Children Are Boring is a short and amusing book that challenges society’s modern view of parenting.

Pages: 98 | ASIN: B084KQXP53

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Save Magic City

Save Magic City by [Rocsanne Shield]

Edmund is a murderous sorcerer and knight with a long rap sheet. His latest crime gets him banished seven hundred years into the future and cursed to obey only good commands or face severe pain if his actions cause anyone suffering. Stuck in the future, he soon receives a sense of purpose and goes through a remarkable transformation when Leona and her son Leo find him in the woods. Bound to obey her every command, Edmund attempts to get her to allow him to save her collapsing town with magic but she refuses. Together with some friends, they must find realistic ways to go up against the big corporation that has left the citizens jobless and save the penniless town. All the while, Edmund and the people of Magic City are oblivious to a secret adversary lurking in the shadows, biding his time.

Rocsanne Shield’s Save Magic City is a fantasy novel brimming with intrigue and fun. Don’t be fooled by the title. Though magic and other supernatural elements like telepathy form the threads of Shield’s story, at the core of this tale are deeper themes.

For one, the author helps us recover the appreciation for our world we may have lost through familiarity. The author does this by showing us the world through the lens of one just discovering its thrills.

With shreds of humor here and there, the book reflects a child-like playfulness anyone would love. I also loved that Shield’s work is a fairly easy read. It’s great for children too because of its inspiring themes, child characters, and simple language.

The author serves up content you might consider wholesome. It’s bursting with hope, unity, and cooperation. It’s a needed glimpse into what people are capable of when they band together to tackle collective problems.

Sheild establishes a balance between the need for human effort and a little sprinkle of serendipity. No matter who we are, some factors will lead to our fortunes which we’ll have zero power over. Call those factors answered prayers, granted wishes from the universe; anything, but we can’t deny that fate conspires to bring good our way as much as it does evil too. The story felt linear at time, but then a twist would come along that I didn’t see coming and ensures the book ends on a high note.

I felt a little backstory on some of the major characters would have helped me better connect with them. I’d have loved to know who Leona was and how she came to adopt Leo.

We might be getting a sequel if the way the book ended is anything to go by. While I’ll readily curl up with anything Shield launches next, this book is sure to keep fans entertained in the mean time.

Pages: 304 | ASIN: B07CF4HQCQ

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A Southern California Twist

Thomas Bauer
Thomas Bauer Author Interview

Sundays at Simone’s follows a young man who gets tangled up in L.A.’s high society and weaves through a mix of intriguing characters and situations. What was the inspiration for the setup to your story?

As a native of Los Angeles, I’m pretty tuned into the psyche of the place. Besides, I was always fascinated by the great French salons of the 19th Century and thought it would be fun to give them a Southern California twist. Satire was the attention, but I also got wrapped up in the story of the young pianist and his loves.

Your characters were all interesting and I enjoyed how they evolved throughout the story. What were some driving ideals behind your character’s development?

Michael’s character, like any other, developed through disappointment, heartbreak, triumph, and experience.

What were some themes that were important for you to explore in this book?

I’m always drawn to the place of the artist in each society, so that is certainly near the top. Also, the pretensions that come with wealth and sometimes fame. Also, the ups and downs of ambition.

What is the next book that you are working on and when will it be available?

The Anachronist has just been published.

Author Links: Amazon | GoodReads

A wealthy Los Angeles socialite with a sordid past creates a modern day version of the 19th Century French salon, where the elite among the aristocracy gather to hear the latest music and poetry and flaunt their trappings of grandeur. Asked to perform, a penniless pianist becomes addicted to these afternoon affairs, which change his life when he discovers more is expected of him than his talent in music. A tale of love, ambition, and betrayal, Sundays at Simone’s looks at the pretensions of Los Angeles aristocracy with a satirical eye, as it chronicles a young musician’s search for true love and a venue for his talent. An odd parade of colorful characters accompanies him on his bizarre journey from a childhood with a Bohemian aunt, to his career as a hack accompanist for would be opera singing waiters at a run down Italian restaurant, to the castles of Beverly Hills, to the movie studios of Hollywood, as the glamorous Simone pulls the strings of her human puppets.

The Inevitable Ambiguity of Words

Author Interview
Anil Author Interview

Strange Bedfellows: Fun with Etymology uses a unique brand of humor to show readers how fun etymology can be. What inspired you to start this series of books?

I am primarily a wordplay writer and have published over 200 articles of assorted styles of word play in the online journal Word Ways, not all humorous. Within the general category of word play, my favourite type is constrained writing of various ilks. My two Strange Bedfellows books use the constraint of using only words that are etymologically related to construct fun phrases and sentences. I then embellish them with my own weird sense of humour in explaining or more often simply extending the SB thoughts to a more free form of humorous expositions and stories.

The idea of using pools of etymologically related words as a type of constrained writing came to me when I noted, in Eric Partridge’s wonderful etymology dictionary Origins, what a huge number of interesting words are surprisingly ultimately related to ‘legend’. From there I devoured Origins looking for other pools of relatives offering interesting combinations. I collected many and managed two volumes of the constructions from them as skeletons on which to overlay my personal style of humour and nonsense. The latter is heavily influenced by the writings of Will Cuppy as well as Lewis Carroll, Roald Dahl, James Thurber, Ogden Nash, Dr. Seuss, Edward Lear and others.

What is the collaboration process like between you and the illustrator, Kalpart?

Kalpart is the company name of a commercial art collaboration headed by Kalpa Joshi. For my books, I describe to her the images I visualise and she is very compliant in revising her first efforts to capture them until they meet my wishes. Other of her artists usually do the final coloured illustrations. I couldn’t ask for a more cooperative artist. She does, however, often make suggestions that I like and let her use.

What is one thing you hope readers take away from your book?

Joy! Plus a sense of the inevitable ambiguity of words, phrases and sentence that allow puns and other twists to amuse and/or expand the reader’s perspectives. (Oops, that two things!)

What is the next book that you are working on and when will it be available?

I have two upcoming books, both being sequels to my Silly Animal Rhymes and Stories A to Z (‘SAR1′, 2018), profusely illustrated in colour by Kalpart. They use a different type of constrained writing, monorhyme verses on animal themes, which I call animal uni-verses.

  • 101 Animal Universes, unillustrated and with limited prose addenda, finished and seeking a publisher as a ‘pure’ poetry book. Hence the release date is unknown. It includes some of the best verses from SAR1 and the following (SAR2) plus many more mostly new universes.
  • Silly Animal Rhymes and Stories: Zoo Two, in press, text approved and awaiting the rest of Kalpart’s brilliant illustrations, half finished. It should be finished and released in 2-4 months but possibly longer. This and my three recent books are self-published by SBPRA, the fifth (101AU) hoping to find a regular publisher, but failing that, again to use SBPRA.

I also have three other books firmly in mind, all partly written, the second two illustrated:

  • a short small book of embellished Spoonerisms;
  • a commercial satire Dr. Duck’s Dealy Deli based around an enterprise and characters that clutter the pages of my other five books; and
  • a rewrite of an old self-illustrated volume from 1979, Anno Dodo, a humorous satire cum word play on the theme of extinction.

Author Links: Amazon | GoodReads

Etymologically related words, most surprisingly so (strange bedfellows), are used to construct amusing and/or amazing pairs, phrases and whole sentences, mostly accompanied by silly or satirical comments, tall tales with recurring characters, poems, fake news and fake ads for Dr. Duck’s Dealy Deli. An appendix gives many other pairs of surprisingly related synonyms, antonyms, etc., balanced by the converse – pairs one might expect to be related but are not.

I Used Kaos

Simon carr
Simon Carr Author Interview

Apocalypse Blockers follows an odd group of unlikely heroes that take on a mission to prevent the apocalypse. What was the inspiration for the setup to your story?

Apocalypse Blockers is a culmination of several different books of mine, each character has their own book in which they already stopped an apocalypse, all very different books and different genre’s, they all have very long back story’s that are not linked, I used Kaos as a way to link them and bring them all together in one place, I don’t think you need to read the other books first but the idea being they will be better after you have read Apocalypse Blockers or Apocalypse Blockers will be better after you have read them.

I enjoyed the creativity imbued in your characters. What were some driving ideals behind your character’s development?

I wanted to move the characters on a bit, I did not just want to throw them all together without any of them changing or growing, this would be the last time I work with any of them so I wanted to leave them all in a good place, the Running theams with Rick Tonail in every book he has been in was that he needed to stop doing everything alone and get some freinds, Bob and Karen found eachother and a new dynamic was born for them two, the good father’s and Green had their own issues that they worked through and Larry and Max finnaly got to stop being in a post- apocalyptic zombie apocalypse.

This seemed like a fun book to write. What was the funnest scene for you to write?

For me the scene were Bob and Rick first meet fathers O’Malley and O’Riley who were coaching at the over 80s wrestling championships was the funniest thing to write.

What is the next book that you are working on and when will it be available?

I am working on my first young adults book at the moment called, Noobs, it’s a story about two friends caught in the afterlife when a meteor takes out the kabab shop they were in, the Grim reaper makes a deal with them that they can go back if they retrieve ten keys from inside different video games, it should be finished by June.

Author Links: GoodReads | Facebook | Twitter | Website

The fate of every living thing in the multiverse that’s has ever existed or is going to exist rests in the hands of a band of, well, weirdos if I am honest but they are our only hope.Our reality and every possible reality are under attack from an evil force called Khaos that has sent apocalypse after apocalypse at every reality around the planet earth.Not every version of earth fell, a mighty few stopped the apocalypse sent by Khaos, these few are all that stand in the way of Khaos, these warriors, these heroes, these apocalypse Blockers!

Apocalypse Blockers

Apocalypse Blockers by [Simon carr]

Apocalypse Blockers by Simon Carr is a fun, short story about the end of the world. It is not as serious as it may first sound. In the book we follow a number of different characters that could be described as weird and strange. Each of the characters comes from a different dimension, they are right away forced to unite and join forces to avoid and block the end of everything that ever existed, to be known as the apocalypse of the multiverse.

The book serves as a parody of superhero stories and fantasy adventures. The characters presented are funny and are constantly making the most nonsensical claims possible, all of it adding up to an entertaining, comic-relief type of story. There are gods, priests, vampires, wizards, werewolves and even zombies. Different realities in the multiverse are visited by our group of main characters, in an attempt to block and stop an impending apocalypse in each of them, thus eventually receiving the name of “apocalypse blockers”.

The best part of this book is its creativity and blatant hilariousness that will leave readers laughing. There are many jokes and silly phrases throughout this unconventional story that truly makes it stand out. There are no rules followed nor limits to the way in which the world presented operates, a technique that allows the author to enjoy complete liberty through which he displays ridiculous, yet funny situations. However enjoyable the novel is, I found myself lost in some sections as I found it hard to follows some scene to scene transitions as there was some rather large leaps without reorienting the reader.

Apocalypse Blockers is a book that was written with the idea of fun in mind, its main purpose being to entertain its readers. Each character is unique and humorous in their own way. The humor presented throughout the entirety of the story made for a lighthearted read that included a number of witty remarks. I appreciate how uniquely different this story is from anything that I have read, it is an interesting approach that I would like to see more of in the future.

Apocalypse Blockers is an exciting science fiction adventure story that tells a hilariously wry superhero story that is consistently entertaining and witty.

Pages: 238 | ASIN: B08W81Z68G

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