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CHOOSING LIFE – A Poem for Suicide Prevention

Beloved one at the rim to the other side.

Today, I bring you my companionship with words,

for I will never claim to know your journey to this point.

 

Before we converse, I ask you to put away the rope,

the rope you are holding so tight as a bridge away from this world.

 

It is dark, and we are going to need some light to be seen.

I am lighting a wood fire to invoke all our guardians to join us.

Let us praise and thank them for protecting and guiding us to here.

 

Before we speak, lend me your arms so I can pray for our life.

Allow me to unburden what is weighing you to this moment.

Speak it or not, but I shall remain here holding hands ’til dawn.

 

The night is vast, and we will not be rushed to light.

What matters is we stay here together, facing this darkness.

I will not let us die emotionally in helplessness.

I have brought my heart and mind to drink them, and I hope

you will allow me to refill yours with spoons of hope and love.

 

The bridge before us is unknown, and I would have flown if I knew.

But we are still here, together, gazing at this fire, and I pray

it will not die before we have untied the knot in your heart

and the thoughts fencing you away from hope and worthiness.

 

Lend me your heart and mind so I can give mine.

I don’t know what tomorrow has in store for us

but on this night, I vow to keep you safe in my arms.

 

This night is ours only; we will own and claim it like the moon.

I hope you will take it and decide to keep, and it is all right

to visit in phases—sometimes full and sometimes waning.

Thank you for taking this night and allowing me to be in it.

 

The fire is still burning and the night blushing with hope.

The embers of life ignited; I see you choosing to stay.

Weary, battered, and bruised, you have chosen to stay.

Tomorrow can come, and I see you walking back to life.

 

TUZIBEBE KANGA ZETU

TUZIBEBE KANGA ZETU

Leo siku ya simanzi
tuzibebe kanga zetu.
Tusambaze kona zake nne
zikawe ngao ya uchungu wetu.
Kanga zetu zibebe faraja
hadharani na faraghani.
Magufuli katutoka
kama jua linalozama.
Tuzibebe kanga zetu
tukasambaze matumaini.

Machozi yatutiririka
kwa kasi ya mto Ruvu.
Tuzibebe kanga zetu
tukadeki nyuso zetu.
Kilio kimetutia kikwi
tujisitiri na kanga zetu.
Waliotangulia tuwaombee
heri iwavushe kwa maulana.
Tuzibebe kanga zetu
kama mkeka wa sala.

Kanga zetu tuzifukize rehema
ili tujawe karama.
Vinyongo na visasi tupepee
vitoweke kwa haya na soni.
Marehemu wetu tuwaenzi
fedheha sio kanga yetu.
Tuilinde amani yetu
kwa umaridadi wa kanga.
Tuyavae maneno mema
kwa madaha ya utanashati.
Tuzibebe kanga zetu
tukamuage baba yetu.

Tamati ya maisha imefika
buriani haitoshi pindo.
Kanga zetu ni vigawanyio
kati ya mauti na maisha.
Sare za kanga zetu
ni shada zenye thamani.
Tutandike kanga zetu
kwenye njia ya mazishi.
Waliolala wanafarijika
kusindikizwa kifahari.
Tuzibebe kanga zetu
safari ya baba imekwisha.

Translation/Subtitles:

LET US CARRY OUR KANGAS

Today is a day of mourning
let us carry our kangas.
Let us spread its four corners
as a shield for our pain.
Our wraps should carry comfort
publicly and privately.
Magufuli has left us
like the setting sun.
Let us carry our kangas
to go spread hope.

Tears are welled up
like the speed of the Ruvu river.
Let us carry our kangas
to mop our faces.
Weeping has hiccupped us
let us shield ourselves with our kangas.
Let us pray for the gone ones
to cross over with blessings.
Let us carry our kangas
like a prayer mat.

Let us fragrance our kangas with mercy
so we may be gifted with deliverance.
Let us wave away bitterness and vengeance
that they depart ashamed and confounded.
Let us honour our late loved ones
for ridicule is not our kanga.
Let us protect our peace
with beauty of the wrap.
Let us wear good words
with pride of elegance.
Let us carry our kangas
to bid farewell to our father.

The end of life has come
farewell does not fit the hem.
Our kangas are a border
between death and life.
Our kangas as uniforms
are valuable wreaths.
Let us lay our kangas
on the road to the funeral.
Those gone are comforted
by this elegant escort.
Let us carry our kangas
our father’s journey is over.

Let’s Go Walking in the Storm

Let's Go Walking in the Storm: A Collection of Poetry and Reflections for Soul and Spirit by [Gloria D. Gonsalves]

Let’s Go Walking in the Storm: A Collection of Poetry and Reflections for Soul and Spirit, by Gloria D. Gonsalves contains over one hundred poems, including more than a dozen reflections on various topics. This anthology of poetry is comprised of poems about tolerance and inclusionappreciating life, holding on to dreams, overcoming obstacles, protecting the earth, preserving nature, the COVID-19 pandemic, and death. The quantity of poems in this book ensures that each reader can find ones that speak to them personally.

I liked the poems with uplifting messages, that made me feel like we don’t have to be the perfect image that society depicts, and we shouldn’t compare ourselves to other people or what others expect us to be. I think it’s important for people to realize that they don’t have to be like everyone else, that we should embrace our own individual uniqueness.

The structures of the poems varied, which helped to make them feel distinct even though similar themes were used in multiple poems. For example, one of the poems was structured so that the first letter of each line spelled out a word that was the theme of the poem, some poems had very short verses of only two or three words, while other poems were broken up in to sections, and one poem was written in Swahili. Some of my favorite poems were the ones about nature. Like the author, I’ve always found joy in being outdoors. It was interesting to read the author’s notes at the end of some of the poems and reflections, which gave insight into the inspiration for writing them, or additional information about certain aspects of the prose. I enjoyed reading the reflections that asked questions of the reader to encourage thinking about and rethinking our own perceptions and considering how the concepts could be applied to our own lives.

Pages: 160 | ASIN: B08NVGY6NV

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A POEM IS LIKE A TREE – Gloria D. Gonsalves

A poem is like a tree:
stuck where it was created, waiting
while receiving what passersby give.
Sometimes, whoever squats on it
gives not suitable compost for growing,
a causal act for sloping to the ground—
the roots ready for the wind death.

A poem is like a tree:
swaying this way and that way
nodding its approval and disapproval
if taken to where the branches meet
the crown or not, for lessons and admiration.
Whoever rushes it to the top,
the branches won’t be there to save it.

A poem is like a tree:
sometimes thin, sometimes thick,
the diameter of its body promises not
of being understood or scolded
by the light necessary to photosynthesize
the human condition as a diet,
for life to be relished and respected.

A poem is like a tree:
it will leave you rooted where you are
or extend your branches for the unknown.
What you grasp or not in the stretch of verses
will thin or thicken the trunk of your soul.
Either way, the wind of trials will bend you
and the triumph is to keep swaying towards life.

 

Gloria-Gonsalves.com

 

2020 Soliloquy (a poem)

2020 SOLILOQUY

By Gloria D. Gonsalves

www.gloria-gonsalves.com

We Are Earth (A Speech Poem)

We Are Earth (A Speech Poem)
Gloria D. Gonsalves
www.gloria-gonsalves.com

 

Inspire Creativity in Others

Gloria D. Gonsalves Author Interview

Gloria D. Gonsalves Author Interview

Danloria: The Secret Forest of Germania is an enchanting children’s book that takes kids on an educational adventure. Why was this an important book for you to write?

I grew up in Tanzania where to me, nature is a place to collect firewood and fresh grass for livestock, hunt edible animals and a place to watch out for as a home to deadly snakes. I never imagined that one could leisurely visit a forest just for its aesthetic beauty. Fast-forward to years later, I am living in Germany and one of the leisure activities is spazieren (to walk) in the forest especially on Sunday. My husband has a knowledge of wild plants passed on to him by his parents. One day during our usual Sunday walk, I got an idea to write a book. I thought it was important to share the knowledge of wild plants to children since I didn’t have it when growing up.

I loved the children’s artwork in this book. What made you want to go this route with the art for this book?

One of my aspirations as a writer is to inspire creativity in others or showcase those who have potential. The idea to involve children with illustrations started with a book prior to this one. The book is about diamond poems and I thought it would be boring for children to read as text only. I approached friends, colleagues and family, who gave consent to have their children involved in the book. It was a try and I am grateful for their trust in my intentions. I got feedback of children treasuring the book as well as increased confidence in what they can achieve in art because someone believed in them to draw in their book.

I loved Stan’s character. What was the inspiration for his development and journey?

Stan is an imagined version of my husband as a child learning about nature from his parents. Danloria is a coined name from the letters of his first name and mine. Other characters are from our favourite forest in the Siebengebirge (Seven Mountains or Hills).

What is the next book that you are writing and when will it be available?

The manuscript for a third sequel of Lamellia is almost done and an illustrator is working on it. I am planning to have it out by autumn.

Author Links: Facebook | GoodReads | Website

Danloria is a forest located in the seven hills of Germania. Not everyone in Germania knows about the forest. Stan is a little boy who enjoyed visits to the forest with his father. One day, his dad fell sick, and Stan was led to the forest without his father by wise Fern. It was during this adventure that their friendship was sealed. During this forest visit, Stan was introduced to prominent residents of the forest and told of their benefits to human life. On one unfortunate occasion, Stan fell sick. The healing process introduced him to more friends of Fern from forests all over the world, such as Asilandia, Afrilandia, Califoria, and Englandia. These encounters with Fern’s friends formed an everlasting memory on the little boy.

This book is a blend of fantasy, adventure and education. The story is enchanting for readers young and old alike if you are a fan of nature adventures and fantasy. The different styles for each drawing makes each turn of the page a brand new experience. Danloria is written for children under seven.

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That Loving Gesture

Gloria D. Gonsalves Author Interview

Gloria D. Gonsalves Author Interview

Jai the Albino Cow is a lovely children’s book that teaches kids how special it is to be different. What was your inspiration for this book?

During a holiday in Austria while hiking going uphill, I felt exhausted and lay down on a grazing pasture. A brown calf approached and licked my face. That loving gesture was indelibly printed in my mind.

Once back home in Germany, I had an idea to write a story about cows. I vividly remember that the story lead was going to be a female and her name is Gundula. The idea landed on a list I keep for children’s story topics. I wrote, “Once upon a time, there were three cows Gold Bell, Spotty and their sister Gundula. They lived with their mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. Moo, in the alpine meadows of Nocky mountains. Gold Bell always wore…”

On another occasion visiting my home country Tanzania, I observed more cows in the pastures of Usambara Mountains. Soon after, the story idea developed further with themes from my motherland. I desired to create a main character who is female, different and also have her story address the topic of human diversity.

In some African countries, people with albinism have suffered and are still suffering from discrimination and other horrendous acts including being hunted for their body parts for magic potions by witch doctors. We can help solve this problem through stories which teach love and respect from an early age, such as in this book which uses a cow as the protagonist.

The book is told in both English and Swahili. Why did you want to tell this story in both languages?

My mother tongue Swahili is spoken not only in Tanzania but also in the neighbour countries of Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo and Mozambique. The intention to have a bilingual story was with a hope that the message will have a great impact and reach many more, particularly in areas where albinos are maligned.

I loved the art in this book. It was both artful and bright. What was the art collaboration like with Nikki Ng’ombe?

Nikki is a daughter of a friend. Besides being acquainted with each other, she is very professional and delivers concrete results. We have worked together in another book project and already knew each other’s pace of work. She grasped quickly the vision I had for this book. I will certainly work with her again if not occupied by studies.

What is the next book that you are working on and when will it be available?

I am currently proofreading a manuscript for a children’s Swahili book co-authored by Tanzanian writers. We intend to publish this year.

Author Links: Facebook | GoodReads | Website

Jai the Albino Cow: Jai Ng’Ombe Zeruzeru by [Gonsalves, Gloria D.]

Can an albino cow possess abilities to be admired by other cows?

Anjait (Jai) is Ankole cow who lived with her family in Kole Hills. Jai suffers from albinism. Other cows thought she was cursed. One day, Jai shocked other cows for doing something that no other cow did before. She also surprised them with a magical skill.

What is it that Jai did as the first ever cow? Will her actions and skill help bring love and respect to albino cows?

Get your copy now to find out the answers and reveal to your children the importance of showing kindness and respect to everyone, even if they look different.

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