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We’re Not Heroes

We’re Not Heroes, by Helen Daniels, is the story of a group of friends that are stuck at a farmhouse after what they originally thought was an earthquake hits Australia. They have suspicions on what actually has happened after their electricity goes out, cars stop working, and the mountains are on fire. Maree and her husband Jon are worried for their children so they set off on a journey to find them.

The author, Helen Daniels, transports readers to the Great Southern region of Western Australia. The level of detail describing the scenery and people in her story transports the readers right into the action. Following along side Jon and Maree as they are fighting for survival will have readers turning pages quickly to see if they can make it to their children and survive this changing world’s destruction.

The characters are well developed and relatable. Readers will want to keep reading because they get invested in the personal emotions and stories of the characters. You begin to understand why certain characters in the story make the choices that they do in a time of crisis. The story builds slow before catapulting into the action. With a strong balance of narrative and action readers will feel like they are part of the story, racing to find their loved ones.

We’re Not Heroes by Helen Daniels is a riveting, captivating and suspenseful post-apocalyptic novel that will have you hooked to the very last page. Readers of action, adventure, suspense and post-apocalyptic science fiction will enjoy this relentlessly entertaining survival story.

Pages: 330 | ASIN : B09K4V6FH8

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Streets of Tears

Streets of Tears by Larry J. Hilton chronicles the trials and happenings of the Baur family during World War I. It is a work of historical fiction portraying life in the trenches of warfare, as well as the rise of the Nazi party and impending dictatorship under Hitler, and the events that eventually led to the Holocaust. Following the perspectives of multiple characters throughout, each chapter contained crucial outlooks on the war and its subsequent effects on the economy. The story highlights Depression-era struggles while also shedding light on the viewpoints and mentalities that are shaped by the horrors of war, and its aftermath. 

Streets of Tears was an enjoyable read, with likable characters and a captivating storyline. I particularly enjoyed how each chapter was from the stance of a different character or plot line. The story was woven together with humor, heartache, and horror, leaving me wanting more at the end of each chapter.  What I enjoyed the most was getting to know characters through the viewpoint of other characters, as well as within their individual chapters. 

As a work of historical fiction, it was delightful to see the ideologies of characters and the causes they were fighting for. This allowed for an open minded outlook on why people believed what they believed, and gave me a chance to reflect on what it is I believe. Another thing this book did was give me a glimpse into the lives of the women of the Nazi regime, and why it is they were involved in the first place. This was fascinating as it is not something you see very often in books that revolve around this time period. More often than not, you are given a look into the eyes of those affected by the Nazi party. 

Streets of Tears by Larry J. Hilton is an eye opening perspective on life during World War I and under Hitler. A riveting piece of historical fiction for readers that enjoy period pieces, ideologies of war, and psychological fiction as it pertains to people individually and as a society as a whole. 

Pages: 399 | ASIN : B08LQYH77S

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The Penitent: Part III

The Immortality Wars The Penitent Part III is the epic conclusion of The Penitent Trilogy. In a battle between good and evil, Pall Warren is in the middle of it all, fighting evil demons to save humanity from the tyranny of an occult priest. Set in a world reminiscent of the Middle Ages with a fantasy spin, Pall continues on his quest to reconnect with his friend, John Savage, and find his place in the world.

The story begins with Pall helping Tom in the aftermath of the Ünger attack. He travels with Tom and his daughter to their new home in Gullswater. While in Gullswater, Pall puts feelers out to see where he can find the bowman, aka Savage. Leading Pall on a quest to Seascale, where he joins forces with Mercer, an ex-member of Gregor Mordant’s Marauders.

Once in Seascale, Pall and Mercer begin their mission to track down Savage and quickly find themselves deep in battle. Meanwhile, Savage works with his boss, Peredurus, the King’s Minister of Affairs, to update him on West Fündländ. Savage also alerts Peredurus to his views that Mordant is a traitor to the King. Peredurus begins his mission to validate Savage’s belief. All parties start to build the forces up for the impending war.

What I loved most was the multiple POVs, especially during the battle. I love when authors utilize this writing style as it gives me a better insight into the motives of the characters. A. Keith Carreiro is a strong writer, at times his style is more formal to help set the tone and add depth to the characters personality. I benefited from learning multiple new words as he has an expansive vocabulary.

The Penitent by A. Keith Carreiro is a thrilling adventure novel written for fans of fantasy and science fiction. The author is skilled at world-building and excels at keeping the reader engaged. Overall a strong finish to this riveting trilogy. Readers will enjoy finding out how Carreiro wraps up things.

Pages: 292 | ASIN: B07WCHGRKC

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To Tell Their Incredible Story

Author Interview
Ernesto Patino Author Interview

Enough to make the Angels Weep follows a private detective on a murder case that leads him to a 150-year-old conspiracy. What was the inspiration for the setup to your story?

I was inspired to write the story after seeing the movie One Man’s Hero, set in Mexico during the Mexican-American War. It was about the San Patricios, the St. Patrick’s Battalion, composed of U.S Army soldiers of Irish descent who switched sides at the beginning of the War. I had never heard of this story and wondered why it had been omitted in history books that I’d read about the Mexican-American War. In doing research, I found only a handful of books about the St. Patrick’s Battalion. Most were written within the past twenty to twenty five years. As a writer, I knew that I had to write a novel, to tell their incredible story which has made them heroes in Mexico and Ireland.

Your characters are intriguing and well developed. What were some driving ideals behind your character’s development?

First of all, I brought back P.I. Joe Coopersmith, a former FBI investigative assistant, who first appeared in a previous novel, Web of Secrets. Other characters, including the young woman who hired Coopersmith to investigate the murder of her grandmother, were ordinary people whose patience and ideals were tested again and again throughout the novel.

What were some themes that were important for you to explore in this book?

There were two themes, really. The first was the Mexican-American War and the second was the Irish Famine which forced thousands of Irishmen to come to America in search of a better life. Signs on store windows that said WORKERS NEEDED. IRISH NEED NOT APPLY, made it increasingly difficult to find employment, and so many joined the U.S. Army. Of course the new recruits new little about America or its politics with regard to Mexico.

What is the next book that you are working on and when will it be available?

I just completed a new novel, A Cry for Vengeance. It begins with a deathbed confession of a former Nazi who admits to the killing of thousands of Jews and undesirables at Treblinka Concentration Camp during WWII. He and other Nazis had been recruited by American Intelligence shortly after the war. The book will be released within one to two years.

Author Links: GoodReads | Website

Hired to investigate the murder of an 84-year-old widow, P.I. Joe Coopersmith hits one dead end after another in his search for leads. With few clues and no suspects, he nearly gives up, until he uncovers a connection to a bizarre plot to kill the descendants of Irish soldiers who fought for Mexico during the Mexican-American War. Known as San Patricios, they belonged to the St. Patrick’s Battalion, an elite Mexican unit composed mostly of Irish Immigrants. When a well-preserved diary of an Irish soldier turns up, Coopersmith knows he’s on the right track. He digs deeper into the plot, soon learning the identity of the man behind it and his warped motive for the cold-blooded murder of the elderly widow.

The Road Remembered

The Road Remembered is a riveting historical fiction novel by author Kaye D. Schmitz which recounts the final months of World War II through the eyes of two main characters. On one side, there’s American soldier Sam Ryan, fresh out of training in the 89th Infantry Division, and on the other Gerda Ziegler, a German woman responsible for saving the lives of countless Jewish children.

The author has done impeccable research and interviewed several veterans to bring this story to life, including her own father, the real-life figure who served as inspiration for Sam Ryan. Gerda is also based on a real hero, Irene Sendler, the woman responsible for saving over 2,000 children during the war.

Together, these two viewpoints create a vivid picture of war that condemns the Nazi ideology, but also shows there were good people on both sides of the conflict. The writing is the strong point of the book. The accounts are so detailed that it is very easy to get absorbed by the narrative and feel like you are living that reality with the characters.

Both main characters are well developed and their thoughts and motivations are well explained. The narratives and settings from these two perspectives differ wildly from one another. However, the horrors created by war are ever-present in the protagonists’ minds.

As events unfold, we are curious to know the outcomes of the characters, since we know the one from the war. There is also some excitement about which circumstances the protagonists will meet and what will come out of that.

The book keeps a steady pace right up until the end of the war where we are then treated to something of an epilogue in the last few pages. However, in the end, there’s a beautiful payoff that wraps it all up beautifully.

The Road Remembered is a compelling account of events from World War II with enough liberties taken to make it a fantastic piece of historical fiction. With realistic characters and an enveloping narrative this is a book I highly recommend.

Pages: 334 | ASIN: B0975VVDH6

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Dearest Mother and Dad

“One hundred and twenty Marines wounded. Eighteen dead. All for one lousy hill.”

Corpsman Orrin Connor’s faithful letters with a touching twist shield his parents from the horrors of war. His buddy Rawley Armstrong’s poignant letters give his sister the harrowing truths. Throughout their dangerous assignments during the Korean War, they debate the consequences of their choices. Orrin gains comfort in downplaying his experiences while Rawley feels a healing purge. As they get to know the Marines in their charge, the corpsmen gather a variety of opinions. Although Orrin and Rawley disagree, their friendship remains true until the bitter end.

“It all happened within minutes. For some, it would last a lifetime.”

Based on her father’s letters to his parents throughout the Forgotten War, author Christina Thompson has produced this work of historical fiction to pay tribute to Navy corpsmen by remembering their service to their brothers and their country. Imagining her father had guarded his parents from the carnage of war, Christina elaborates on what could have happened while staying true to the dates and experiences her father shared in his actual letters.

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Dark Rain

Dark Rain by [Dana Duthie]

Dark Rain is an exciting terrorist thriller written by former Air Force Pilot, Dana Duthie. The story opens up with the protagonist, Col. Brad Mitchell “Conan” flying in his F-16 along with his wingman who turns out to be an impersonator. At the same time, a series of similar “Starkville” penetration unfold at different parts of the States, including a failed attempt to bring down the White House. The investigation into the “Starkville” families reveals Barak El-Kamani as the main handler who is pulling all the strings.

Duthie has expertly utilized his twenty-four years of Air Force experience to paint a realistic picture of military operations with a detailed account of events, from the cockpit of the fighter jet to the White House Situation Room. The author has given a great deal of attention to character development as well. President McDivitt’s role remains refreshing throughout the operation. The Washington Post reporter portrays the tendency of media to go to any ends to get the news. The chapters are brief but very engaging, rarely losing focus on the action and events that are propelling this story forward. The chapters are organized according to the place where the events unfold. This allows the reader to understand the full scope of the story. Which is vital because this is a global story with far reaching effects. The riveting action in the story reminds me of the movie Top Gun, but mixed with the intrigue of Robert Ludlum novels.

Dark Rain is both a novel and an encyclopedia at the same time. The author has included a plethora of military and fighter pilot jargon which is likely to be a delight to any military enthusiast. While the beginning half of the book sets up the larger storyline, the ending half of the book is filled with thrilling action and combat. For anyone with a military background, especially the Air Force, Dark Rain is a goldmine.

Dark Rain is a captivating military thriller that takes readers around the globe and places them in the middle of some high stakes world politics that ensures there’s rarely a dull moment in this suspenseful action novel.

Pages: 330 | ISBN: 1645509699

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Midnight Flight to Nuremberg

Midnight Flight to Nuremberg, by Marcus A. Nannini, is the riveting story of Harry Watson Jr’s time as an aviation pilot during World War II. Harry Watson recounts his time enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps, as well as his home life, in this stirring and dramatic memoir.

Harry Watson Jr. dreamed of being a pilot. He knew his only chance to get out of a life in the coal mines was to enlist in the military. He went through the necessary training to become a C-47 Pilot/Instructor and earned many awards throughout his time in the Air Corps. One of the most important flights during his career was to bring Franz Von Papen back to base from Nuremberg, Germany. Von Papen was held high in German society and a key contributor to Hitler’s rise in power.

Author Marcus Nannini tells Harry’s time in the Air Corps with precision and a keen eye on the key aspects of a gripping story. As a reader, you feel as if Harry is telling you about his experiences himself. Nannini does Harry justice in the way he tells this story. The reader is able to see what is behind the scenes for a soldier during World War II, the path to becoming an aviation pilot during those times, and who Harry was as a person. Nannini was also able to give the reader a glimpse into the lives of Harry’s fellow crewman and friends. The friendship between Lang and Watson was one I adored reading about. This book not only tells Harry’s military story, but offers further insight into tactics and important figures during Hitler’s reign of terror, making this perfect for military history enthusiasts.

Midnight Flight to Nuremberg is a wonderful retelling of Harry Watson Jr’s experiences as a pilot and instructor during World War II. I would recommend this story to anyone who enjoys history, listening to real-life experiences from World War II, and to those who want to follow a compelling person through one of the most dramatic times in history.

Pages: 224 | ISBN:1526792737

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