Blog Archives

The Implications of Immortality

David Crane Author Interview

David Crane Author Interview

Price of Life follows immortals and the battle between the factions of immortals over the future of the human race. What was the inspiration for the setup to this thrilling novel?

The inspiration for this novel came to me from the 1990’s Highlander series starring actor Adrian Paul in the title role. The show was very successful and I was thrilled about the plot and the theme regarding the implications of immortality. The novel was also inspired by my studies of eastern philosophies and mysticism as well as ancient European tales of humans becoming demigods as a result of an accident or a test by the gods or mysterious alien forces.

You did a fantastic job of blurring the lines between good and evil in this book. What were some driving ideals you used while writing?

The driving ideals I used in my writing were about two worlds, one official,l dominated by humans, another secret, dominated by the immortals. I thought that it would be interesting to put these two worlds on a collision course and give each character human and immortal a unique voice that would define their personalities and be the driving force behind their actions. Just like in the human world, among many immortals in my novels the lines between good and evil are sometimes blurred depending on a situation they find themselves in.

Dina is one of my favorite immortals. Who was your favorite character to write for?

Dina’s character is also my favorite in the story and initially, I wanted to tell the story from her point of view but decided to give each character a chance to speak for themselves. Dina’s actions are good and decent, and her personality defines her strong moral code and sense of justice. She uses her powers to help people and on some occasions she punishes evil and the people who betray her and those whom she loves. The episode about trying to kill Hitler was actually a stand alone short story I wrote in 2010 and in that story Dina was a mortal person blessed with her extraordinary gift of foresight.

What is the next book that you are working on and when will it be available?

I am currently working on some ideas for my next novel but would like to share with you the novels I wrote during the previous years. I will definitely like to submit another novel to you to be read and reviewed and hope you and your readers enjoy undertaking another literary journey.

Author Links: Amazon | ForemostPress

Price of Life by [Crane, David]

At the dawn of civilization, a prehistoric hunter finds an unusual meteorite that offers him powers of life and death and makes him an immortal. Twelve thousand years later, his descendants, inheriting the gene of immortality, are living in secret among unsuspecting humans. Able to give and take life at will, they struggle for survival across the centuries.

When a group of human fanatics and evil immortals each come with their own horrific plan for world domination, other humans and immortals must join forces to stop them regardless of the cost. At stake is the survival of both races as they prepare to face the greatest challenge of their lives.

Buy Now From Amazon.com

Price of Life

Immortals have walked the face of the Earth for over 12,000 years now. For the most part they have lived at peace with humans, taking only what they need to survive. A cross between a vampire and mythical healer, these immortals have the power to heal humans or take their life force, ageing them to death. It is from this feeding of a life force they gain their immortality. Most will only feed off the those that cause harm to the world. However, there are those immortals that believe they are a god race and it is their job to purge the Earth of humans and start over. Price of Life by David Crane is the story of how immortals got to present day and the battle between the two factions over the future of the human race.

The novel reminded me of the Highlander series, there can be only one! But, aside from the beheading to kill an immortal, that is where it ends. The immortals in David Crane’s novel are more like vampires that are sustained by the lifeforce of the world around them. Humans are the “best” quality food, but any living organisms can sustain them. Together they have lived in peace for over 12,000 years. The flashbacks from modern time to tell the story of where each immortal comes from is in-depth. Nonfiction and fiction blend seamlessly in this work. The details about Hitler and the concentration camp will bring you to tears hearing the stories and make you cheer as immortals avenge the death of their families at the hands of the Nazi soldiers. In some novels, flashbacks are too confusing to keep up with, but this is done so well that it is seamless, and you get a full picture. The subplots all tie into the main story line in a way that makes sense. All the lives and stories fit. From early mankind villages, to war torn Europe, to modern America facing many of the challenges we see even still today in the news, it all combines to tell a story that you want to read. The character development is built into the flashbacks and lets the reader really get to know each person involved. There are surprise twists, good is not always nice and on the right side of the law, bad is not always malice. The lines are blurred in a way to a keep the balance in check.

One of my favorite characters is Dina, she is an immortal with a special ability to see the future, it has made her wealthy and she uses her gift to better the world where she can. She saw the horrors of what Hitler would do to the world and she wanted nothing more than to stop it. Her passion is helping people, using her immortality to better the Earth and advance humans, not hold them back. When she has visions of Los Angeles being destroyed and the end of all human life at the hand of immortals, she must figure out how to stop things.

Immortals are left to choose what side they want to be on, they must work together to save the world they helped shape and create. It is a great novel about survival, compassion, history and how it shapes the future. A thrilling novel to see if humans can be saved before they become nothing more than slaves and a food source for the immortals that believe themselves to be gods.

Pages: 318 | ASIN: B00Y424WD6

Buy Now From Amazon.com

Underneath it All, She’s a True Monster

A.J. Macready Author Interview

A.J. Macready Author Interview

Redemption details the rise and fall of a line of vampires dominating Clarke’s Summit, which is home to a plague dating back to the 1700’s. What attracts you to vampire fiction?

I grew up watching a lot of horror and sci-fi, although it was some time before I got into reading any of the literature. I think the first thing that attracted me to vampire fiction was the story potential in their great longevity, the fact that they are virtually immortal. Another compelling aspect of vampire fiction is the fundamental struggle they represent between light and darkness, good and evil, and how people can be seduced by their desire for power, immortality, and even sexual desire.

In one scene in Redemption, the vampire Lydia illustrates this for us in how she tempts Mike Gaston with the fact that she has remained beautiful and unaffected by age or disease in over two hundred years. I think this is one reason why the vampire genre has grown “softer” in recent decades, with television shows like Forever Knight and films like the Twilight Series: A lot of people want what vampires have – power, beauty, immortality – and they’re doing their best to try and capture these elements while skirting the darker side of the legend. This is a major factor in why I wrote the Descendent Darkness series as I did. To phrase it biblically, vampirism is “a covenant with death and an agreement with hell.” I wanted to return to the core of the legend: vampires as the living dead, seduced by an inhuman darkness that is at war with the light.

Lydia, an ancient vampire is seeking vengeance on the three remaining members of the town’s founders. I found her character to be well developed. What was your inspiration for her character?

First off, I went with a female because females are traditionally the victims in vampire literature, and I thought it would be interesting to depict one as a master for a change. Frankly, I’m surprised that it hasn’t been done more often.

As to her character, I drew it from the description Richard Gaston provides of her in Redemption, as one who has turned her back on the light and the image of God. She’s not a victim; she actually chose to be what she is. She is the embodiment of deliberate, calculating evil, a force that feeds on the living world like a parasite. Mike Gaston describes her eyes as “thin ice over deep water,” and this is also illustrative of her character. Her human facade is just that; underneath it all, she’s a true monster, and was even before she became one of the living dead.

This is book three in the Descendant Darkness series. What were some new things you wanted to introduce into your series in this book, and what were some thing you felt had to stay the same?

The original title of this book was End Game, and that sums up the approach I took with it. The first book set the stage and lined up the pieces. The second book set them into motion. The third book is all-out war, a fight to the death. With this one, I had to bring all of the various elements I had established together, intersect all of the characters and plotlines, and resolve the whole mess in a believable fashion. That was the main thing that had to change: I couldn’t run independent subplots anymore. Everything had to mesh.

As for what needed to stay the same, well, the best stories are character-driven, and it was my primary task to ensure that established characters continued to be the people readers had come to know, even though they found themselves in new situations.

Will there be a book 4 in the Descendent Darkness series? If so, what would that story be about and when would it be available?

No, the book series is complete. I’ve told the story I wanted to tell and don’t have anything else to add, although I will miss Mike and Holly. It’s amazing how characters tend to grow on you through the writing process. I originally conceived of the series with a truly dark ending, but as the story developed I found that I couldn’t let it go that way. The characters themselves ended up driving the plot.

Author Links: GoodReads Amazon Facebook Blog

Descendent Darkness: Book Three: Redemption by [Macready, A.J.]

“Now boast to me again, old man. Tell me what strength there is in you to contend with me.”

After twenty-one years, that which the men of Clarke’s Summit feared most has been realized. The evil they prayed would stay buried for eternity has risen, intent on destroying those who imprisoned it and drawing their loved ones into darkness.

In the war between good and evil, victory can be had only at the price of blood. Now as Mike and Richard Gaston race against the coming night, and those they care for most fall around them, they must prepare to offer the most precious blood of all on the altar of their family’s redemption.

Buy Now From Amazon.com

A Short Story Thought Experiment

Derek Edgington Author Interview

Derek Edgington Author Interview

Immortal: Curse of the Deathless is a fantasy novel bursting at the seams with an intricate world waiting to be discovered. What was the inspiration that drove the development of the world Asher lives in?

Immortal started as a short story thought experiment: I wanted to try integrating a character’s internal thoughts into the story, as well as (at some points) speak directly to the audience. After I started writing, I knew fairly quickly that Asher’s story required me to write something approaching “book” length. So I started world building and writing character descriptions, and Immortal: Curse of the Deathless was the product of that. It definitely is a little rough around the edges (I’m in the process of producing another edition to clean up egregious editing errors), but that was part of its charm. Asher is an unfiltered character, and while his story is one that won’t appeal to everyone, it’s one that I truly enjoyed writing. If you look closely, you may find that I worked in satire— about icons and religious practices, while also de-sanctifying the immortal. One of the guiding notions of Asher’s development is my annoyance about the peril main character’s are put into throughout the regular course of a novel— danger which, if the story is to continue, can never truly put the MC in danger. Creating an immortal character was my way of making a point about this trend.

Asher is a funny and well developed character. Did you create an outline for his character before you started writing or did his characters personality grow organically as you were writing?

Asher’s personality is a permutation of my own, and so a large reason he comes off as so well-developed from the get-go is that I’m fairly well developed as a person myself. That said, as a character he did grow organically (along with his character description) and I did write a fair amount of descriptors for the character even when I thought I was writing a short story. I think any writer should write what they know best first— with the caveat that they should push themselves to develop their style and create better content with each publication. When I wrote Immortal, I was sticking to a fairly known style that came with a limited viewpoint, but a lot of interesting potential. With my latest publication, I pushed those boundaries and created something outside my usual genre, with a different character archetype while shifting my writing approach.

In the Fae Realm, Asher gets caught up between two feuding noble houses, Summer Court and Winter Court. What were the driving ideals behind these houses while you were developing them?

The Summer Court and Winter Court are two sides of the same coin. There is an obvious patriarchy in Winter, and the matriarchy of Summer opposes it. Although both Courts are inherently dangerous (especially for outsiders), Summer is, like the season, warmer and more welcoming. Winter is a closed fist, and it rules by force. Its manipulations are sharp, jagged edge.

Are you writing a second novel as a follow up to Immortal: Curse of the Deathless? If so, when is that book due out?

A great question. Yes, Immortal: Reckoning is the sequel to Immortal: Curse of the Deathless. The series title is The Immortal Chronicles, and I’ve laid out my projected publication dates of the following two books on my website homepage (along with all my other future publications for most of the next year)>>> www.derekedgington.com. Immortal: Reckoning is due out in November 2016, and Immortal #3 will be published on May 7, 2017 (exactly a year after the first book was published).

Author Links: GoodReads | Twitter | Facebook | Website

Immortal: Curse of the DeathlessAsher Hearst is a college student, and the closest thing he’s got to a superpower is his ability to take a punch. Basically all he has going for him is an edgy sense of humor– and, of course, that he can’t die. As a small-time fixer, he’s about to field a job request best left to the pros, because once he gets involved with witches and the supernatural, there’s no turning back. While Asher becomes immersed in the secret world of the supernatural, he makes few allies and some very powerful enemies. At least traveling across space and time will bring him some unexpected romance, right? “Immortal: Curse of the Deathless” is a humorous, action-filled story with gritty, sometimes horror-inspiring elements. Over its three parts, the book spans multiple worlds: a modern, urban city of the 21st Century, as well as Tír na nÓg, a land that’s home to the Fae (Sídthe) from classic Celtic Mythology.

Buy Now From Amazon.com

If it Bleeds, it Leads

Stealing the Sun begins in a traditional way, but then takes a turn that defies traditional fantasy story telling. What was your approach to writing this story?

The story developed organically. I started with reflections of traditional fantasy tropes (the elven maid falls in love with the mortal hero; the evil dark lord) and went from there. In some cases I deliberately twisted things (the ‘evil dark lord’ character is female and primarily interested, not in dominating the world, but in escaping from it), but in other cases my feelings about the story, my sense that there was another side to be shown, took over. Once the scene was set and a given character did something, others would react, often unwisely, and in that way they all managed to get themselves in a lot of trouble by the end of the book.

I felt that Stealing the Sun delivers the drama so well that it flirts with the grimdark genre. Was it your intention to give the story a darker tone?

If it bleeds, it leads…

In your other book, Tribulation’s War, the magic in that story was minimal and delivered believably (if magic can ever be believable) as it was in this story as well. How did you handle the magic in this story and how did it evolve as you were writing?

Most of the magic in the world of Stealing the Sun isn’t really magic but science (sort of). I wanted to look at elves, at the way that elves are traditionally portrayed (immortal, unsleeping, able to see in the dark and take sustenance from the sun, able to shapechange) and make those qualities make at least quasi-scientific sense. To be ever-young, it seems to me that a creature would need to be able to shapechange, to get rid of old, damaged cells and regenerate them. When Altir visualizes the “moving spirals and the beads of light” before he shape changes, he’s actually consciously manipulating his own DNA, although he doesn’t know that’s what he’s doing. There will be much more on shapestrength in the later books. The rune-magic of the greycloaks, on the other hand, is something I have never figured out scientifically. Basically it’s just magic, or at least psychic ability, with a good dose of nasty herb-lore mixed in.

Stealing the Sun has some interesting people that have their character flaws, but they’re still likable. How do you go about creating characters for your stories?

Characters come to me organically, without much planning involved. They seem to already exist by the time I get to them. I create a world and situations that contain conflict, and out of the conflict comes the sort of characters who fit with that world. Sometimes the characters who seemed like supporting cast end up having the strongest voice – Altir originated as a secondary character in a short story. In the next book, The Dark of the Sun, someone who didn’t get his own point of view in the first book insisted on telling his side of the story. I like characters who have different facets, who have flaws and strengths, who have a past – I’m not particularly interested in innocent coming of age characters, or one-dimensional villains, either to read about or to write.

When is the next book in the Sun Saga series due out?

The Dark of the Sun and A Red Morn Rises, the second and third books, are available now. There may be a fourth book to come.

Author Links: Website | Facebook | GoodReads

Stealing the Sun: Sun Saga, Book 1Disinherited from the throne he believes should belong to his clan, rejected by the woman he loves, estranged from his father and uncertain of his place in a war-torn world, Altir Ilanarion searches for his path. Meanwhile, his kinsmen scheme and plot to overthrow their rival and regain the throne — but all the while, the Liar’s servants lie in wait.

Buy Now From Amazon.com

%d bloggers like this: