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Portals in Time: The Quest for Un-Old-Age

Portals in Time: The Quest for Un-Old-Age by [Teressi, John Joseph]

In the book Portals of Time, The Quest for Un-Old-Age, a team of ten Gripps were put together from the prison system to travel to other times, universes, or even dimensions to find the answer to the question, “how do we get more time”? The problem with their society was that people were aging before their time and, diseases of the elderly were showing up in the youth. Many teams were sent out to find information to Un-Old-Age some came back and some didn’t, the teams that came back with helpful information were pardoned from prison. Each team member had a talent or unique knowledge that was essential to the success of the mission.

This team, the Eye of Time Exploration Team, landed on Acronos. Upon first landing they have to travel across a sea and are attacked by sea monsters feeding off of their fear and when they reach the main land they encounter the guardians of this mystical land in the form of two dogs that will ultimately be their guides through this strange world. The team goes through a series of events known as: Hedges of Hedora, the river of time, the forest, time warps, and time vortexes, as well as meeting teachers, Bo and Ben, Fabius and Filloloper, along the way that give them the answers to Un-Old-Age in riddles but ultimately the team has to figure out what the messages are. It is never outright told to them. Each Gripp takes a different amount of time to learn the lesson but there are always a couple that never get it.

The book was hard to put down, I would spend hours at a time reading it. It covers so much indirectly and directly at the same time when it comes to society, spirituality, and the mentality of a society as well as our society. The weaving of all of the previously mentioned, with quantum physics, was so well done that I never lost track of the story line and it was so easy to make the connections in the book to our real world. I liked that it made me think about my own existence and belief system. I really like the Harmony poems describing the harmonies and the quotes that were highlighted throughout the book and then the way they were broken down by chapter at the end of the book.

I would advise to look for extra un-needed words in some places and a needed word or two in other places. The only other thing that I would have done would be put the description of the different Gripps at the beginning of the book instead of at the end of the book. Other than that, this is a beautifully written book, one that I think many people would enjoy for it’s unique vision of the world and it’s subtle yet profound commentary on society.

Pages: 412 | ASIN: B0797PTD46

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Something Beautiful From The Ugly Pain

Sean Michael Author Interview

Sean Michael Author Interview

Stygian is a collection of poems that are presented as a poetic autobiography. Why was this an important book for you to write?

Great question. As you know the biographical material in Stygian shows that I had a very disturbing childhood, and the things that happened to me then have weighed on my mind for many years. I had to write this book in order to get my feelings about this stuff off my chest before I could ever write about anything else. Since the release of Stygian, I have written poems about the gold rush, politics, war, the discovery of King’s tut’s tomb, and so much more. I’m really interested in historical stuff right now. Stygian opened up a doorway of creativity to me by releasing me from the past. In writing this book, I learned quite a bit about the craft as well as myself.

My personal favorites are “The Man in the Box” and the “Endless Tunnels of Darkness” which are beautifully descriptive. What was your favorite poem in this collection?

Wow, let’s see. I love to utilize nature and animals in my writing so a couple of my favorites are “A Forest Called Madness” and “The Elusive Bird,” as well as “Lies Kill,” which features a purple elephant.

What I like most about this book was that it was frank and dark and didn’t hold back. What do you hope readers take away from Stygian?

I think that there is a stereotype attached to poetry that it is always lovey-dovey, flowery hillsides, and blue skies, but that certainly was not the case with Sylvia Plath or Edgar Allan Poe, nor is it with me. I hope that readers will see how powerful poetry can be and range of emotions, thoughts, and ideas that can be expressed in verse. Furthermore, I hope to inform the uninformed, but most of all I hope to touch a wounded soul, so that they know they are not alone, that no matter how broken one’s life seems there’s always the choice to build something beautiful from the ugly pain.

What is the next book that you are working on and when will it be available?

Since the release of Stygian, I have finished a complete autobiography, and compiled another collection of poems. I am also working on a full-length novel called Broken Homes. I’m usually working on a few projects at a time. Most recently, I had a short story called “A Murder of Crows” published in the British horror magazine, Morpheus Tales. I’ve had several other short stories and poems appear in on-line publications. Two of my poems have been accepted for a poetry anthology to come out sometime this year. I’m hoping to get a release date soon. My dear grandmother maintains a blog for me, where I post about my current life and opinions, give updates about my work, and talk about writing techniques.

Author Links: GoodReads Twitter FacebookWebsite

StygianPoverty, drugs, child abuse… The streets’ incarceration… Questions of life and contemplations of death, Stygian is the darker side of poetry collected from teen years into young adulthood and composed in homeless camps, churches and a jail cell. The emotion is raw, the poetry is real.

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Stygian

Stygian

Stygian, by Sean Michael, is a thematic arrangement of 52 poems based on the author’s life, interspersed with occasional quotes. The anthology is completed by an additional three poems in memory of three late friends. Stygian is organised in chronological order, from the author’s tragic childhood to the events that likely contributed to his incarceration, as mentioned in the author’s biography; in this way, the collection presents itself as a poetic autobiography. It’s a frank and dark work, which doesn’t hold back from the usage of swear words or in the stark descriptions of abuse, neglect and self-harm, so readers should use their discretion.

There’s a lot that could be said about this author, but after a read through, what stood out the most was the wide variety of poetic styles he used. The contents range from poems that read almost like a rap, written with short staccato lines and a regular rhyme scheme, to others that feel classical, with long and flowing verses. Partly, this seems to be a stylistic choice, and a clever one, too. Poems from his youth embody the language of a child, such as the word “doggie”, while the adult mind raids the full English lexicon to produce descriptions containing such gems as “empyrean” and “tenebrous”. It’ll give your linguistic knowledge a workout, that’s for sure. Other poems have a more contemporary feel; one appears to be a piece of prose, while The Monster is written entirely in capital letters.

However, there is much to recommend; poems like Sleeping with my Shoes On, which throws away a rhyme scheme to convey a sense of childish excitement, at odds with the glimpses of a deprived childhood. My personal favourites are The Man in the Box and the subsequent Endless Tunnels of Darkness which are beautifully descriptive and flowing summaries of the author’s life (and therefore Stygian) and his emotions about his current situation.

The order of other poems feels like an emotional jump as a reader, yet this is easily explained by the author’s unsettled life – art reflecting life in every way. It is uncomfortable to read the memories described in Away From the Disarray or Something to Cry About, but this is beside the point, which is to honestly portray everything the author has been through.

With this in mind, it can only be said that this is an effective piece of work. Just as no human can be fully understood by another. The content cannot be dismissed, because it is true, although it could be argued that it was still a little raw in places – like the emotions it conveys. The author does show great competency with a range of styles, though, and I would personally love to read more from him on other topics after he has developed some of his ideas further.

Pages: 97 | ASIN: B01G5WFHUE

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